The Assessment of Clinical and Economic Outcomes Associated with Stroke in Rural Emergency Departments

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/614294
Title:
The Assessment of Clinical and Economic Outcomes Associated with Stroke in Rural Emergency Departments
Author:
Richards, Traci; Tysoe, Marianne; Skrepnek, Grant H.
Affiliation:
College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona
Issue Date:
2013
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
Specific Aims: The purpose of this study was to assess the cliical and economic predictors assocaited with rural emergency department visits in stroke patients. Methods: The current research was a retrospective, observational, cohort study. Multivariate regression was used to assess data from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) 2009 Nationwide Emergency Department Sample (NEDS). Inclusion criteria were at least 18 years of age and rural ED admission with principle diagnoses of stroke. Main Results: Significant results for risks included: Intubation for increased mortality (OR = 17.432, p = 0.001), increased length of stay (IRR = 1.643, p = 0.018) and increased charges (exp β = 2.289, p = < 0.001); myocardial infarction for increased mortality (OR = 1.969, p = 0.006), decreased charges (exp β = 0.862, p = 0.013) and decreased length of stay (IRR = 0.853, p = 0.001); moderate to severe liver disease for increased mortality (OR = 62.691, p = 0.001) and reduced length of stay (IRR = 0.517, p = 0.025); congestive heart failure for increased mortality (OR 1.978, p = 0.003) and increased charges (exp β = 1.118, p = 0.039); non-specific cancer (OR = 2.447, p = 0.017) and metastatic cancer (OR = 4.799, p = 0.016) for mortality; hemiplegia/paraplegia for increased charges (exp β = 1.173, p = < 0.001). Conclusion: The current study found a better understanding of national estimates of burden of illness to further define clinical decision rules for stroke in rural emergency departments.
Description:
Class of 2013 Abstract
Keywords:
Outcomes; Stroke; Emergency Departments; Economic
Advisor:
Skrepnek, Grant H.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorSkrepnek, Grant H.en
dc.contributor.authorRichards, Tracien
dc.contributor.authorTysoe, Marianneen
dc.contributor.authorSkrepnek, Grant H.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-22T22:40:37Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-22T22:40:37Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/614294-
dc.descriptionClass of 2013 Abstracten
dc.description.abstractSpecific Aims: The purpose of this study was to assess the cliical and economic predictors assocaited with rural emergency department visits in stroke patients. Methods: The current research was a retrospective, observational, cohort study. Multivariate regression was used to assess data from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) 2009 Nationwide Emergency Department Sample (NEDS). Inclusion criteria were at least 18 years of age and rural ED admission with principle diagnoses of stroke. Main Results: Significant results for risks included: Intubation for increased mortality (OR = 17.432, p = 0.001), increased length of stay (IRR = 1.643, p = 0.018) and increased charges (exp β = 2.289, p = < 0.001); myocardial infarction for increased mortality (OR = 1.969, p = 0.006), decreased charges (exp β = 0.862, p = 0.013) and decreased length of stay (IRR = 0.853, p = 0.001); moderate to severe liver disease for increased mortality (OR = 62.691, p = 0.001) and reduced length of stay (IRR = 0.517, p = 0.025); congestive heart failure for increased mortality (OR 1.978, p = 0.003) and increased charges (exp β = 1.118, p = 0.039); non-specific cancer (OR = 2.447, p = 0.017) and metastatic cancer (OR = 4.799, p = 0.016) for mortality; hemiplegia/paraplegia for increased charges (exp β = 1.173, p = < 0.001). Conclusion: The current study found a better understanding of national estimates of burden of illness to further define clinical decision rules for stroke in rural emergency departments.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en
dc.subjectOutcomesen
dc.subjectStrokeen
dc.subjectEmergency Departmentsen
dc.subjectEconomicen
dc.titleThe Assessment of Clinical and Economic Outcomes Associated with Stroke in Rural Emergency Departmentsen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.en
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