Evaluation of Storage Conditions on Evaporation Rate of IV Solutions

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/614268
Title:
Evaluation of Storage Conditions on Evaporation Rate of IV Solutions
Author:
Squire, Christina; Mihoch, Nathanael; Lee, David
Affiliation:
College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona
Issue Date:
2013
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
Specific Aims: To determine if temperature and direct sunlight influence the rate of evaporation of normal saline in 100mL IV bags. Methods: Four study groups were created; refrigeration, dark shelf, shelf near window, and EMT box simulation. 80 bags (50 ml bags of normal saline) placed in different areas of temperature change and sun exposure. 20 of the bags stored in a drawer in a refrigerator. 20 stored on a shelf in a dark temperature controlled room. 20 stored next to a window in direct sunlight, and 20 stored outside where temperature and sun exposure will be highest in an EMT simulated box. Weights were recorded (in gms) weekly for 8 weeks using an analytical balance. Each saline bag was weighed individually and recorded at the time of measurement. Main Results: Rates of volume loss were lower in the normal saline IV bags stored in a refrigerated environment compared to the other two groups stored at room temperature and the one group stored in outside conditions (p<0.001). IV bags stored at room temperature exposed to light had the second lowest rate of loss compared to the other two groups (p<0.001 compared to outside conditions and p=0.003 compared to closed drawer). Bags stored at room temperature in a closed door had the third lowest rate of loss (p<0.001). Conclusion: Rate of fluid loss from IV normal saline bags appears to be temperature sensitive and storage of these bags may have an impact on shelf life of the product.
Description:
Class of 2013 Abstract
Keywords:
Storage; IV Solutions; Evaporation; Rate
Advisor:
Lee, David

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorLee, Daviden
dc.contributor.authorSquire, Christinaen
dc.contributor.authorMihoch, Nathanaelen
dc.contributor.authorLee, Daviden
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-22T22:19:48Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-22T22:19:48Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/614268-
dc.descriptionClass of 2013 Abstracten
dc.description.abstractSpecific Aims: To determine if temperature and direct sunlight influence the rate of evaporation of normal saline in 100mL IV bags. Methods: Four study groups were created; refrigeration, dark shelf, shelf near window, and EMT box simulation. 80 bags (50 ml bags of normal saline) placed in different areas of temperature change and sun exposure. 20 of the bags stored in a drawer in a refrigerator. 20 stored on a shelf in a dark temperature controlled room. 20 stored next to a window in direct sunlight, and 20 stored outside where temperature and sun exposure will be highest in an EMT simulated box. Weights were recorded (in gms) weekly for 8 weeks using an analytical balance. Each saline bag was weighed individually and recorded at the time of measurement. Main Results: Rates of volume loss were lower in the normal saline IV bags stored in a refrigerated environment compared to the other two groups stored at room temperature and the one group stored in outside conditions (p<0.001). IV bags stored at room temperature exposed to light had the second lowest rate of loss compared to the other two groups (p<0.001 compared to outside conditions and p=0.003 compared to closed drawer). Bags stored at room temperature in a closed door had the third lowest rate of loss (p<0.001). Conclusion: Rate of fluid loss from IV normal saline bags appears to be temperature sensitive and storage of these bags may have an impact on shelf life of the product.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en
dc.subjectStorageen
dc.subjectIV Solutionsen
dc.subjectEvaporationen
dc.subjectRateen
dc.titleEvaluation of Storage Conditions on Evaporation Rate of IV Solutionsen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.en
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