Exercise and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Exercise Duration and Intensity and Their Effects on HbA1c and BMI

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/614264
Title:
Exercise and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Exercise Duration and Intensity and Their Effects on HbA1c and BMI
Author:
Hoelzer, C. Garrett; Phillips, Evelyn; Rautenbach, Marna; Slack, Marion
Affiliation:
College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona
Issue Date:
2013
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
Specific Aims: To assess the impact that exercise-type has on diabetes control through improvement in monitoring parameters such as hemoglobin A1c and fasting blood glucose. Methods: Studies were selected using a study inclusion tool and then data was extracted using the data extraction tool. The primary outcomes assessed were BMI and HbA1c. The standardized mean difference (SMD) was the main summary measure and the I2 statistic ¬¬¬¬¬¬was used to assess variability among the studies. Main Results: Ten studies met inclusion criteria (Total N = 1,787). The age range of patients was 40-66 years old with equal amounts of male and female participants. Aerobic and resistance exercise were effective (p < 0.01) in reducing A1c; Tai Chi was not (p = 0.50). Aerobic exercise did not have a significant effect on BMI (p = 0.07), however Tai Chi and Resistance exercise did (p<0.04). Conclusion: Aerobic and resistance exercise produced a significant reduction in HbA1c, whereas Tai Chi did not. The non-significant impact aerobic exercise had on BMI was probably due to large variation between the studies. No significant differences were found between the different forms of exercise and their overall impact on diabetes control. Based upon the data incorporated in this meta-analysis, it is reasonable for patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 to use aerobic or resistance exercise to improve their HbA1C. However, it remains to be seen whether recommending specific exercise types over others will provide increased benefit.
Description:
Class of 2013 Abstract
Keywords:
Diabetes Mellitus; meta-analysis; HbA1c; BMI
Advisor:
Slack, Marion

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorSlack, Marionen
dc.contributor.authorHoelzer, C. Garretten
dc.contributor.authorPhillips, Evelynen
dc.contributor.authorRautenbach, Marnaen
dc.contributor.authorSlack, Marionen
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-22T21:56:43Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-22T21:56:43Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/614264-
dc.descriptionClass of 2013 Abstracten
dc.description.abstractSpecific Aims: To assess the impact that exercise-type has on diabetes control through improvement in monitoring parameters such as hemoglobin A1c and fasting blood glucose. Methods: Studies were selected using a study inclusion tool and then data was extracted using the data extraction tool. The primary outcomes assessed were BMI and HbA1c. The standardized mean difference (SMD) was the main summary measure and the I2 statistic ¬¬¬¬¬¬was used to assess variability among the studies. Main Results: Ten studies met inclusion criteria (Total N = 1,787). The age range of patients was 40-66 years old with equal amounts of male and female participants. Aerobic and resistance exercise were effective (p < 0.01) in reducing A1c; Tai Chi was not (p = 0.50). Aerobic exercise did not have a significant effect on BMI (p = 0.07), however Tai Chi and Resistance exercise did (p<0.04). Conclusion: Aerobic and resistance exercise produced a significant reduction in HbA1c, whereas Tai Chi did not. The non-significant impact aerobic exercise had on BMI was probably due to large variation between the studies. No significant differences were found between the different forms of exercise and their overall impact on diabetes control. Based upon the data incorporated in this meta-analysis, it is reasonable for patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 to use aerobic or resistance exercise to improve their HbA1C. However, it remains to be seen whether recommending specific exercise types over others will provide increased benefit.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en
dc.subjectDiabetes Mellitusen
dc.subjectmeta-analysisen
dc.subjectHbA1cen
dc.subjectBMIen
dc.titleExercise and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Exercise Duration and Intensity and Their Effects on HbA1c and BMIen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.en
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