Effect of Blood Glucose in the Emergency Department on Hospital Length of Stay

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/614255
Title:
Effect of Blood Glucose in the Emergency Department on Hospital Length of Stay
Author:
DiLeo, Jessica; Johnson-Clague, Michaela; Prze, Jennifer; Patanwala, Asad
Affiliation:
College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona
Issue Date:
2013
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
Specific Aims: The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of early blood glucose correction in the Emergency Department (ED) on hospital length of stay. Methods: This study has received institutional review board approval. This is a retrospective cohort study conducted in an academic medical institution. Diabetic patients with hyperglycemia in the ED between June 1st, 2011 and June 30th, 2012 were included. Patients were excluded if they were less than 18 or greater than 89 years of age, not admitted, had diabetic ketoacidosis or hyperglycemic hyperosmolar state, treated with insulin for hyperkalemia, trauma patients, or had an initial blood glucose value of 200 mg/dL or less. Patients were categorized into two groups based on blood glucose control achieved within the first 24 hours from triage. The primary outcome of this study was to compare hospital length of stay between the groups. Main Results: A total of 161 patients were included in this study. Baseline demographics between groups were statistically similar with the exception of gender (p=0.635), ethnicity (p = 0.149), and co-morbidities calculated by the Charlson Co-Morbidity Score (p = 0.112). Blood glucose values in the ED did not statistically correlate to hospital length of stay (p = 0.299), however, co-morbidities were predictive of hospital length of stay (p = 0.025). Conclusion: Early correction of blood glucose values in the ED are not associated with hospital length of stay.
Description:
Class of 2013 Abstract
Keywords:
Glucose; Emergency Department; Stay
Advisor:
Patanwala, Asad

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorPatanwala, Asaden
dc.contributor.authorDiLeo, Jessicaen
dc.contributor.authorJohnson-Clague, Michaelaen
dc.contributor.authorPrze, Jenniferen
dc.contributor.authorPatanwala, Asaden
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-22T21:23:51Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-22T21:23:51Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/614255-
dc.descriptionClass of 2013 Abstracten
dc.description.abstractSpecific Aims: The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of early blood glucose correction in the Emergency Department (ED) on hospital length of stay. Methods: This study has received institutional review board approval. This is a retrospective cohort study conducted in an academic medical institution. Diabetic patients with hyperglycemia in the ED between June 1st, 2011 and June 30th, 2012 were included. Patients were excluded if they were less than 18 or greater than 89 years of age, not admitted, had diabetic ketoacidosis or hyperglycemic hyperosmolar state, treated with insulin for hyperkalemia, trauma patients, or had an initial blood glucose value of 200 mg/dL or less. Patients were categorized into two groups based on blood glucose control achieved within the first 24 hours from triage. The primary outcome of this study was to compare hospital length of stay between the groups. Main Results: A total of 161 patients were included in this study. Baseline demographics between groups were statistically similar with the exception of gender (p=0.635), ethnicity (p = 0.149), and co-morbidities calculated by the Charlson Co-Morbidity Score (p = 0.112). Blood glucose values in the ED did not statistically correlate to hospital length of stay (p = 0.299), however, co-morbidities were predictive of hospital length of stay (p = 0.025). Conclusion: Early correction of blood glucose values in the ED are not associated with hospital length of stay.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en
dc.subjectGlucoseen
dc.subjectEmergency Departmenten
dc.subjectStayen
dc.titleEffect of Blood Glucose in the Emergency Department on Hospital Length of Stayen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.en
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