Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/614248
Title:
Value of Aseptic Technique
Author:
Smith, Casey; Patten, Tiara; Herran, Maria; Lee, David
Affiliation:
College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona
Issue Date:
2013
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
Specific Aims: To evaluate the effectiveness of aseptic techniques in preventing microbial growth. Methods: Five stations at varying degrees of aseptic technique evaluated the purity of transfers into two different growth media. Stations included a control using proper aseptic technique under a laminar flow hood, “Clean Nurse” used proper aseptic technique on sanitized countertop, “Sloppy Nurse” used no aseptic technique on un-sanitized counter top, “Clumsy Nurse” dropped the syringe on the floor, used no aseptic technique on un-sanitized counter top, and “The Paramedic” used proper aseptic technique on outdoor picnic table. Fluid was transferred from a dextrose and sodium solution 10 times, each time with a new needle, into TSB growth media bags. Then, 1 mL growth media was pulled from GrowMed media vial with 1 mL volume room air and agitated. The remaining room air was ejectedandmedia re-injected back into vial, and repeated ten times using same needle and syringe. Samples placed in an incubator at 29oC and visually checked for signs of bacterial growth after 14 days. The experiment was repeated once. Main Results: Out of the five scenarios that were prepared in duplicate, only one sample yielded contamination. The one positive result was from one sample attained from the “Clumsy Nurse” station. There were 20 samples taken with a total contamination rate of 5%, utilizing the Yates’s chi-square test generated a p value of > 0.01. Conclusion: Although proper aseptic technique is a valuable practice for patient safety, the overall risk to the patient is relatively low.
Description:
Class of 2013 Abstract
Keywords:
Aseptic; Technique
Advisor:
Lee, David

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorLee, Daviden
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Caseyen
dc.contributor.authorPatten, Tiaraen
dc.contributor.authorHerran, Mariaen
dc.contributor.authorLee, Daviden
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-22T21:51:55Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-22T21:51:55Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/614248-
dc.descriptionClass of 2013 Abstracten
dc.description.abstractSpecific Aims: To evaluate the effectiveness of aseptic techniques in preventing microbial growth. Methods: Five stations at varying degrees of aseptic technique evaluated the purity of transfers into two different growth media. Stations included a control using proper aseptic technique under a laminar flow hood, “Clean Nurse” used proper aseptic technique on sanitized countertop, “Sloppy Nurse” used no aseptic technique on un-sanitized counter top, “Clumsy Nurse” dropped the syringe on the floor, used no aseptic technique on un-sanitized counter top, and “The Paramedic” used proper aseptic technique on outdoor picnic table. Fluid was transferred from a dextrose and sodium solution 10 times, each time with a new needle, into TSB growth media bags. Then, 1 mL growth media was pulled from GrowMed media vial with 1 mL volume room air and agitated. The remaining room air was ejectedandmedia re-injected back into vial, and repeated ten times using same needle and syringe. Samples placed in an incubator at 29oC and visually checked for signs of bacterial growth after 14 days. The experiment was repeated once. Main Results: Out of the five scenarios that were prepared in duplicate, only one sample yielded contamination. The one positive result was from one sample attained from the “Clumsy Nurse” station. There were 20 samples taken with a total contamination rate of 5%, utilizing the Yates’s chi-square test generated a p value of > 0.01. Conclusion: Although proper aseptic technique is a valuable practice for patient safety, the overall risk to the patient is relatively low.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en
dc.subjectAsepticen
dc.subjectTechniqueen
dc.titleValue of Aseptic Techniqueen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.en
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