Identifying Drug Therapy Problems Through Patient Consultation at Community Pharmacies

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/614231
Title:
Identifying Drug Therapy Problems Through Patient Consultation at Community Pharmacies
Author:
Campbell, Michael; Moslem, Mobeen; Spriggel, Preston; Warholak, Terri
Affiliation:
College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona
Issue Date:
2013
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
Specific Aims: The objective of this quality improvement project is to evaluate if drug therapy problems in a community pharmacy setting can be identified via patient counseling at the time of prescription pick up. The central hypothesis of the project is that patient consultation will aid in identifying drug therapy problems and reduce the amount of negative effects posed by these problems. Methods: This project will assess data obtained through a medication therapy intervention report utilized in multiple community pharmacy environments in Arizona. Any consultation provided to a patient by a pharmacist or pharmacy intern regarding a new or transferred prescription will be eligible for data collection. The primary dependent variable is the number of drug therapy problems identified during consultation. Drug therapy problems will be assessed via expert opinion to identify the potential negative impact they may have posed to patients. Data analysis will involve the frequency and type of drug therapy problems identified during data collection. Main Results: A total of 1305 prescriptions were screened during the data collection period. A total of 29 drug therapy problems were identified upon patient consultation. This yielded a 2.2% drug therapy problem occurrence during data collection. The most commonly occurring drug therapy problem involved a patient drug allergy or sensitivity issue. Conclusion: Future research is warranted on the effects that drug therapy problems have on patients and the healthcare system. This project is descriptive in nature and may not be applicable to every community pharmacy in Arizona.
Description:
Class of 2013 Abstract
Keywords:
Therapy; Consultation; Pharmacies; Drug
Advisor:
Warholak, Terri

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorWarholak, Terrien
dc.contributor.authorCampbell, Michaelen
dc.contributor.authorMoslem, Mobeenen
dc.contributor.authorSpriggel, Prestonen
dc.contributor.authorWarholak, Terrien
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-22T20:58:54Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-22T20:58:54Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/614231-
dc.descriptionClass of 2013 Abstracten
dc.description.abstractSpecific Aims: The objective of this quality improvement project is to evaluate if drug therapy problems in a community pharmacy setting can be identified via patient counseling at the time of prescription pick up. The central hypothesis of the project is that patient consultation will aid in identifying drug therapy problems and reduce the amount of negative effects posed by these problems. Methods: This project will assess data obtained through a medication therapy intervention report utilized in multiple community pharmacy environments in Arizona. Any consultation provided to a patient by a pharmacist or pharmacy intern regarding a new or transferred prescription will be eligible for data collection. The primary dependent variable is the number of drug therapy problems identified during consultation. Drug therapy problems will be assessed via expert opinion to identify the potential negative impact they may have posed to patients. Data analysis will involve the frequency and type of drug therapy problems identified during data collection. Main Results: A total of 1305 prescriptions were screened during the data collection period. A total of 29 drug therapy problems were identified upon patient consultation. This yielded a 2.2% drug therapy problem occurrence during data collection. The most commonly occurring drug therapy problem involved a patient drug allergy or sensitivity issue. Conclusion: Future research is warranted on the effects that drug therapy problems have on patients and the healthcare system. This project is descriptive in nature and may not be applicable to every community pharmacy in Arizona.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en
dc.subjectTherapyen
dc.subjectConsultationen
dc.subjectPharmaciesen
dc.subjectDrugen
dc.titleIdentifying Drug Therapy Problems Through Patient Consultation at Community Pharmaciesen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.en
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