Comparing Teach-Back Method and Standard Method for New Prescription Education During Simulated Counseling Sessions by Pharmacy Students

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/614227
Title:
Comparing Teach-Back Method and Standard Method for New Prescription Education During Simulated Counseling Sessions by Pharmacy Students
Author:
Pett, Ryan G; Andersen, David; Vig, Sierra; Lee, Jeannie
Affiliation:
College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona
Issue Date:
2013
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
Specific Aims: The aim of this study was to compare memory retention between two methods (the teach-back method and the standard method) of educating subjects about mock prescription medications during a simulated counseling session. Methods: Men and women ages 18 to 89 years located on the University of Arizona main campus were recruited to participate. Blinded subjects were randomly placed into either the teach-back method or standard counseling method group. The standard method involved telling the subject eight counseling points about two separate fictitious medications while the subject handled mock prescription bottles. The teach-back method added to the standard method by asking three open-ended questions to recall what was taught and correct any misunderstandings. Memory retention was assessed within 5 minutes by a blinded investigator who asked 6 questions concerning the first hypothetical drug. The total score of correct answers between subjects in the two groups were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test. Also, demographic characteristics (age, sex, education, current prescription use) were compared. Main Results: A total of 62 subjects were enrolled in the study. Subjects in the teach-back method remembered one more counseling point on average compared to those in the standard method (median 6 vs 5, mode 6 vs 5, teach-back and standard respectively; Mann-Whitney U test: Z= -3.08, p=0.0021). Conclusion: The teach-back method is a quick and easy counseling method health care providers can use in their daily practice to improve memory retention by patients who receive new medications.
Description:
Class of 2013 Abstract
Keywords:
teach-back method; prescription; counseling; sessions
Advisor:
Lee, Jeannie

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorLee, Jeannieen
dc.contributor.authorPett, Ryan Gen
dc.contributor.authorAndersen, Daviden
dc.contributor.authorVig, Sierraen
dc.contributor.authorLee, Jeannieen
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-22T20:47:21Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-22T20:47:21Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/614227-
dc.descriptionClass of 2013 Abstracten
dc.description.abstractSpecific Aims: The aim of this study was to compare memory retention between two methods (the teach-back method and the standard method) of educating subjects about mock prescription medications during a simulated counseling session. Methods: Men and women ages 18 to 89 years located on the University of Arizona main campus were recruited to participate. Blinded subjects were randomly placed into either the teach-back method or standard counseling method group. The standard method involved telling the subject eight counseling points about two separate fictitious medications while the subject handled mock prescription bottles. The teach-back method added to the standard method by asking three open-ended questions to recall what was taught and correct any misunderstandings. Memory retention was assessed within 5 minutes by a blinded investigator who asked 6 questions concerning the first hypothetical drug. The total score of correct answers between subjects in the two groups were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test. Also, demographic characteristics (age, sex, education, current prescription use) were compared. Main Results: A total of 62 subjects were enrolled in the study. Subjects in the teach-back method remembered one more counseling point on average compared to those in the standard method (median 6 vs 5, mode 6 vs 5, teach-back and standard respectively; Mann-Whitney U test: Z= -3.08, p=0.0021). Conclusion: The teach-back method is a quick and easy counseling method health care providers can use in their daily practice to improve memory retention by patients who receive new medications.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en
dc.subjectteach-back methoden
dc.subjectprescriptionen
dc.subjectcounselingen
dc.subjectsessionsen
dc.titleComparing Teach-Back Method and Standard Method for New Prescription Education During Simulated Counseling Sessions by Pharmacy Studentsen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.en
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.