A Comparison of Pharmacy Student Intern and Nurse Impact on Home Medication List Completeness During Medication Reconciliation

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/614224
Title:
A Comparison of Pharmacy Student Intern and Nurse Impact on Home Medication List Completeness During Medication Reconciliation
Author:
Michael Ivey; Calkins, Linda M.; Salek, Ferena
Affiliation:
College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona
Issue Date:
2014
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
Specific Aims: The purpose of this quality improvement project was to compare the completeness of home medication lists generated upon hospital admission between pharmacy student interns and nurses. Methods: This project was a retrospective review of completed home medication lists obtained by pharmacy student interns or nurses in a Southern Arizona community hospital. During August and September 2013, medication lists from the previous day’s admissions were collected and de-identified. Medication lists were included in the evaluation if the patient was admitted directly to the hospital or through the emergency department, stayed for at least 24 hours and had at least one home medication upon admission. The primary outcome was the number of omissions left on home medication lists completed by pharmacy student interns or nurses. An omission was defined as any missing information in the medication list categories of drug name, dose, unit, route or frequency. Main Results: Fifty medication lists that included 519 medications were collected in the pharmacy student intern group and forty-four lists that included 376 medications were collected in the nurse group. Of the total medications, nurses left significantly more omissions in the categories of dose (19% vs. 1.9%), units (20.2% vs. 2.3%), and frequency (11% vs. 0.7%), where the P-value was < 0.05 for each. Lastly, the total number of omissions left by nurses compared to pharmacy student interns was significantly different (201 vs. 35 omissions, P < 0.05). Conclusion: Compared to nurses, these results suggest pharmacy student interns left fewer omissions and created a more complete home medication list for patients being admitted to the hospital.
Description:
Class of 2014 Abstract
Keywords:
Intern; Medication; Reconciliation; Impact; home
Advisor:
Calkins, Linda M.; Salek, Ferena

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorCalkins, Linda M.en
dc.contributor.advisorSalek, Ferenaen
dc.contributor.authorMichael Iveyen
dc.contributor.authorCalkins, Linda M.en
dc.contributor.authorSalek, Ferenaen
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-22T20:38:11Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-22T20:38:11Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/614224-
dc.descriptionClass of 2014 Abstracten
dc.description.abstractSpecific Aims: The purpose of this quality improvement project was to compare the completeness of home medication lists generated upon hospital admission between pharmacy student interns and nurses. Methods: This project was a retrospective review of completed home medication lists obtained by pharmacy student interns or nurses in a Southern Arizona community hospital. During August and September 2013, medication lists from the previous day’s admissions were collected and de-identified. Medication lists were included in the evaluation if the patient was admitted directly to the hospital or through the emergency department, stayed for at least 24 hours and had at least one home medication upon admission. The primary outcome was the number of omissions left on home medication lists completed by pharmacy student interns or nurses. An omission was defined as any missing information in the medication list categories of drug name, dose, unit, route or frequency. Main Results: Fifty medication lists that included 519 medications were collected in the pharmacy student intern group and forty-four lists that included 376 medications were collected in the nurse group. Of the total medications, nurses left significantly more omissions in the categories of dose (19% vs. 1.9%), units (20.2% vs. 2.3%), and frequency (11% vs. 0.7%), where the P-value was < 0.05 for each. Lastly, the total number of omissions left by nurses compared to pharmacy student interns was significantly different (201 vs. 35 omissions, P < 0.05). Conclusion: Compared to nurses, these results suggest pharmacy student interns left fewer omissions and created a more complete home medication list for patients being admitted to the hospital.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en
dc.subjectInternen
dc.subjectMedicationen
dc.subjectReconciliationen
dc.subjectImpacten
dc.subjecthomeen
dc.titleA Comparison of Pharmacy Student Intern and Nurse Impact on Home Medication List Completeness During Medication Reconciliationen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.en
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