Medication Adherence Education in U.S. Schools and Colleges of Pharmacy

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/614222
Title:
Medication Adherence Education in U.S. Schools and Colleges of Pharmacy
Author:
Nguyen, Danielle; Lee, Jeannie
Affiliation:
College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona
Issue Date:
2014
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
Specific Aims: Medication adherence is the extent to which patients take their medications correctly and consistently as prescribed.1 The objective of this study was to assess Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE)- preaccredited and accredited schools and colleges of pharmacy for adherence course content in their curricula. Methods: The survey link was sent via email to the Department of Pharmacy Practice Chair, or equivalent, at each institution. The data collected via the online survey included information regarding the details of medication adherence curriculum present at the program. All data remained confidential. Chi-square statistical test was used for analysis to compare hours of adherence education taught in older (in existence ≥ 20 years) versus newer (< 20 years) programs. Main Results: Twenty-eight programs responded among 130 inquiries (22% response rate). Of the respondents, only two colleges of pharmacy offered a course on medication adherence, one as an elective and one as required. Common adherence principles were incorporated into other pharmacy courses with the most common topics being counseling, patient education and communication skills. Older programs taught more hours (> 20 hours) focused on adherence compared to the newer programs, but they did not differ significantly (p = 0.39). Conclusion: Despite the low response rate, the findings show a lack of curricular focus on medication adherence, particularly as an individual course. Further studies are needed to identify adherence training received by student pharmacists, and to evaluate the impact of adherence-focused curriculum components on provision of patient care centered on medication adherence by pharmacy practitioners.
Description:
Class of 2014 Abstract
Keywords:
Adherence; Pharmacy; Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE); Education
Advisor:
Lee, Jeannie

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorLee, Jeannieen
dc.contributor.authorNguyen, Danielleen
dc.contributor.authorLee, Jeannieen
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-22T20:28:27Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-22T20:28:27Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/614222-
dc.descriptionClass of 2014 Abstracten
dc.description.abstractSpecific Aims: Medication adherence is the extent to which patients take their medications correctly and consistently as prescribed.1 The objective of this study was to assess Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE)- preaccredited and accredited schools and colleges of pharmacy for adherence course content in their curricula. Methods: The survey link was sent via email to the Department of Pharmacy Practice Chair, or equivalent, at each institution. The data collected via the online survey included information regarding the details of medication adherence curriculum present at the program. All data remained confidential. Chi-square statistical test was used for analysis to compare hours of adherence education taught in older (in existence ≥ 20 years) versus newer (< 20 years) programs. Main Results: Twenty-eight programs responded among 130 inquiries (22% response rate). Of the respondents, only two colleges of pharmacy offered a course on medication adherence, one as an elective and one as required. Common adherence principles were incorporated into other pharmacy courses with the most common topics being counseling, patient education and communication skills. Older programs taught more hours (> 20 hours) focused on adherence compared to the newer programs, but they did not differ significantly (p = 0.39). Conclusion: Despite the low response rate, the findings show a lack of curricular focus on medication adherence, particularly as an individual course. Further studies are needed to identify adherence training received by student pharmacists, and to evaluate the impact of adherence-focused curriculum components on provision of patient care centered on medication adherence by pharmacy practitioners.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en
dc.subjectAdherenceen
dc.subjectPharmacyen
dc.subjectAccreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE)en
dc.subjectEducationen
dc.titleMedication Adherence Education in U.S. Schools and Colleges of Pharmacyen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.en
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.