Optimizing Patient Adverse Drug Reaction History Through the Use of Structured Open Ended Questions

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/614206
Title:
Optimizing Patient Adverse Drug Reaction History Through the Use of Structured Open Ended Questions
Author:
Choe, David; Stevens, Matthew; Summy, Christina; Herrier, Richard
Affiliation:
College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona
Issue Date:
2014
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
Specific Aims: To assess if the use of three targeted open ended questions elicited more adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and allergies than found in the electronic medical record. Subjects: Inpatients at the University of Arizona Medical Center (UAMC) in Tucson, AZ that were 18 years or older and agreed to participate in the study. Methods: Data was collected using a verbal questionnaire. Each patient was asked the exact same three open ended questions in the same order by the one student to determine the number of ADRs the patient has had. The patient’s electronic medical record at UAMC was used to determine the number of ADRs documented. The number of ADRs elicited by the two methods were documented and compared using statistical analysis. No demographic variables were collected in this study. Main Results: A total of 58 patients at UAMC agreed to participate in our study by answering three targeted open ended questions. Overall the use of the three open ended question did elicit more ADRs (mean = 1.12) than listed on their electronic medical record which were elicited by asking one closed ended question (mean = 0.91). However, the results were not statistically significant (p-value = 0.57). Conclusion: The use of three targeted open ended questions appears to elicit a similar number of ADRs compared to the number of ADRs listed in the patient’s electronic medical record.
Description:
Class of 2014 Abstract
Keywords:
University of Arizona Medical Center (UAMC); Adverse Drug Reaction; patient
Advisor:
Herrier, Richard

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorHerrier, Richarden
dc.contributor.authorChoe, Daviden
dc.contributor.authorStevens, Matthewen
dc.contributor.authorSummy, Christinaen
dc.contributor.authorHerrier, Richarden
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-22T19:26:05Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-22T19:26:05Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/614206-
dc.descriptionClass of 2014 Abstracten
dc.description.abstractSpecific Aims: To assess if the use of three targeted open ended questions elicited more adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and allergies than found in the electronic medical record. Subjects: Inpatients at the University of Arizona Medical Center (UAMC) in Tucson, AZ that were 18 years or older and agreed to participate in the study. Methods: Data was collected using a verbal questionnaire. Each patient was asked the exact same three open ended questions in the same order by the one student to determine the number of ADRs the patient has had. The patient’s electronic medical record at UAMC was used to determine the number of ADRs documented. The number of ADRs elicited by the two methods were documented and compared using statistical analysis. No demographic variables were collected in this study. Main Results: A total of 58 patients at UAMC agreed to participate in our study by answering three targeted open ended questions. Overall the use of the three open ended question did elicit more ADRs (mean = 1.12) than listed on their electronic medical record which were elicited by asking one closed ended question (mean = 0.91). However, the results were not statistically significant (p-value = 0.57). Conclusion: The use of three targeted open ended questions appears to elicit a similar number of ADRs compared to the number of ADRs listed in the patient’s electronic medical record.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en
dc.subjectUniversity of Arizona Medical Center (UAMC)en
dc.subjectAdverse Drug Reactionen
dc.subjectpatienten
dc.titleOptimizing Patient Adverse Drug Reaction History Through the Use of Structured Open Ended Questionsen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.en
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