Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/614196
Title:
Medication Identification Rates by Pharmacists and Nurses
Author:
Lamhang, Brian; Lee, Ae Ri; Lim, Shannon; Apgar, David; Chinthammit, Chanadda; Warholak, Terri
Affiliation:
College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona
Issue Date:
2014
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
Specific Aims: To assess and compare prescribing error-identification rates by healthcare professionals Methods: Pharmacists and nurses from Northwest Medical Center were invited to participate in this study. Participants completed a questionnaire that consisted of 10 fictitious patient prescriptions. They were asked to evaluate the accuracy of the prescriptions and indicated the type of error found, if any. The number of correctly identified prescribing errors, correct types of errors, and error identification rates for each group were calculated. Rasch analysis was used to assess the validity and reliability of the questionnaire. Wilcoxon and Rasch-Welch t-test were used to assess the difference in prescribing error-identification rates. Main Results: Thirty-five out of 700 nurses and 6 out of 20 pharmacists completed the questionnaire (response rate 5% and 30% respectively). Pharmacists had significantly higher error-identification rates compared to nurses (p = 0.0001). Additionally, pharmacists were able to correctly identify the type of error in each prescription (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: Pharmacists were significantly able to correctly identify more prescribing errors and more types of prescribing errors in 10 fictitious prescriptions compared to nurses. Several assumptions and limitations were identified in this study, therefore future studies are warranted.
Description:
Class of 2014 Abstract
Keywords:
Medication; Rates; Pharmacists; Nurses
Advisor:
Apgar, David; Chinthammit, Chanadda; Warholak, Terri

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorApgar, Daviden
dc.contributor.advisorChinthammit, Chanaddaen
dc.contributor.advisorWarholak, Terrien
dc.contributor.authorLamhang, Brianen
dc.contributor.authorLee, Ae Rien
dc.contributor.authorLim, Shannonen
dc.contributor.authorApgar, Daviden
dc.contributor.authorChinthammit, Chanaddaen
dc.contributor.authorWarholak, Terrien
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-22T18:52:55Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-22T18:52:55Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/614196-
dc.descriptionClass of 2014 Abstracten
dc.description.abstractSpecific Aims: To assess and compare prescribing error-identification rates by healthcare professionals Methods: Pharmacists and nurses from Northwest Medical Center were invited to participate in this study. Participants completed a questionnaire that consisted of 10 fictitious patient prescriptions. They were asked to evaluate the accuracy of the prescriptions and indicated the type of error found, if any. The number of correctly identified prescribing errors, correct types of errors, and error identification rates for each group were calculated. Rasch analysis was used to assess the validity and reliability of the questionnaire. Wilcoxon and Rasch-Welch t-test were used to assess the difference in prescribing error-identification rates. Main Results: Thirty-five out of 700 nurses and 6 out of 20 pharmacists completed the questionnaire (response rate 5% and 30% respectively). Pharmacists had significantly higher error-identification rates compared to nurses (p = 0.0001). Additionally, pharmacists were able to correctly identify the type of error in each prescription (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: Pharmacists were significantly able to correctly identify more prescribing errors and more types of prescribing errors in 10 fictitious prescriptions compared to nurses. Several assumptions and limitations were identified in this study, therefore future studies are warranted.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en
dc.subjectMedicationen
dc.subjectRatesen
dc.subjectPharmacistsen
dc.subjectNursesen
dc.titleMedication Identification Rates by Pharmacists and Nursesen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.en
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