Assessing Pharmacist’s, Pharmacy Technicians’, and Pharmacy Interns’ Knowledge of Current Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Immunization Guidelines for Pregnant Women

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/614184
Title:
Assessing Pharmacist’s, Pharmacy Technicians’, and Pharmacy Interns’ Knowledge of Current Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Immunization Guidelines for Pregnant Women
Author:
Hatchard, Jared; Houston, Brent; Spencer, Jenene
Affiliation:
College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona
Issue Date:
2014
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
Specific Aims: The purpose of this study was to assess pharmacists’, pharmacy technicians’, and pharmacy interns’ knowledge of current Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) immunization guidelines for pregnant women. Methods: Questionnaires administered to volunteers during the Arizona Pharmacy Association (AzPA) 2013 Annual Convention and Trade Show collected data showing the volunteers’ level of knowledge about current immunization guidelines; data on professional roles (pharmacist, pharmacy intern, or pharmacy technician), years in practice, current immunization certification status and activity, and practice setting were also collected. Main Results: Questionnaires were completed by 112 volunteers, including 48 pharmacists, 25 pharmacy technicians, and 39 pharmacy interns. The overall percentage of correct answers from all participants was 33%. Pharmacists, pharmacy technicians, and pharmacy interns had correct answer percentages of 41%, 16%, and 34%, respectively. Pharmacy practitioners who were state certified to perform immunizations performed statistically significantly better than the non-certified group (44.2% correct versus 33% correct, P=0.012). Practitioners who work at a practice site that provides immunizations were compared with practitioners who do not, with results trending toward statistical significance, but falling just short (45.7% correct versus 36% correct, P=0.054). Conclusion: The general level of knowledge about CDC immunization guidelines appears to be inadequate among the volunteer group of pharmacy practitioners, possibly leading to missed opportunities for needed immunizations.
Description:
Class of 2014 Abstract
Keywords:
pharmacist’s; technicians’; interns’; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC); immunization; pregnant
Advisor:
Spencer, Jenene

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorSpencer, Jeneneen
dc.contributor.authorHatchard, Jareden
dc.contributor.authorHouston, Brenten
dc.contributor.authorSpencer, Jeneneen
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-22T19:40:35Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-22T19:40:35Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/614184-
dc.descriptionClass of 2014 Abstracten
dc.description.abstractSpecific Aims: The purpose of this study was to assess pharmacists’, pharmacy technicians’, and pharmacy interns’ knowledge of current Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) immunization guidelines for pregnant women. Methods: Questionnaires administered to volunteers during the Arizona Pharmacy Association (AzPA) 2013 Annual Convention and Trade Show collected data showing the volunteers’ level of knowledge about current immunization guidelines; data on professional roles (pharmacist, pharmacy intern, or pharmacy technician), years in practice, current immunization certification status and activity, and practice setting were also collected. Main Results: Questionnaires were completed by 112 volunteers, including 48 pharmacists, 25 pharmacy technicians, and 39 pharmacy interns. The overall percentage of correct answers from all participants was 33%. Pharmacists, pharmacy technicians, and pharmacy interns had correct answer percentages of 41%, 16%, and 34%, respectively. Pharmacy practitioners who were state certified to perform immunizations performed statistically significantly better than the non-certified group (44.2% correct versus 33% correct, P=0.012). Practitioners who work at a practice site that provides immunizations were compared with practitioners who do not, with results trending toward statistical significance, but falling just short (45.7% correct versus 36% correct, P=0.054). Conclusion: The general level of knowledge about CDC immunization guidelines appears to be inadequate among the volunteer group of pharmacy practitioners, possibly leading to missed opportunities for needed immunizations.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en
dc.subjectpharmacist’sen
dc.subjecttechnicians’en
dc.subjectinterns’en
dc.subjectCenters for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)en
dc.subjectimmunizationen
dc.subjectpregnanten
dc.titleAssessing Pharmacist’s, Pharmacy Technicians’, and Pharmacy Interns’ Knowledge of Current Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Immunization Guidelines for Pregnant Womenen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.en
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