EXPLORING CHILDREN'S EXTERNALIZING BEHAVIORS AS A RESULT OF DESTRUCTIVE AND CONSTRUCTIVE METHODS OF PARENTAL CONFLICT

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/614180
Title:
EXPLORING CHILDREN'S EXTERNALIZING BEHAVIORS AS A RESULT OF DESTRUCTIVE AND CONSTRUCTIVE METHODS OF PARENTAL CONFLICT
Author:
WIRTH, ABIGAIL DRU
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The association between constructive and destructive conflict and children’s (age three) externalizing behaviors was examined utilizing the Building Strong Families (BSF) data set. The study included 3,328 mothers and 3,148 fathers reporting on conflict behavior, and mother’s reports on children’s externalizing behaviors. My hypotheses indicated that the more constructive conflict, the less externalizing behaviors exhibited while the more destructive conflict, the more externalizing behaviors shown by the children. The majority of the literature demonstrated similar results to my hypotheses, however primarily focusing on mother’s conflict rather than the father’s conflict methods. Similarly, there was little focus on constructive conflict in the literature. Younger children (age three) were of interest for this study due to the lack of research involving these variables and this age group. The specific emotions theory was utilized to shape and inform my hypotheses. The results for this study supported my hypothesis concerning destructive conflict, but rejected the other discussing constructive conflict. Mothers’ correlations of conflict methods with externalizing behaviors were statistically significant while the fathers’ correlations were not. These analyses indicate further research of constructive conflict and its effects on younger children.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
constructive conflict; destructive conflict; externalizing behaviors
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
Bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Family Studies and Human Development
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Barnett, Melissa

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleEXPLORING CHILDREN'S EXTERNALIZING BEHAVIORS AS A RESULT OF DESTRUCTIVE AND CONSTRUCTIVE METHODS OF PARENTAL CONFLICTen_US
dc.creatorWIRTH, ABIGAIL DRUen
dc.contributor.authorWIRTH, ABIGAIL DRUen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractThe association between constructive and destructive conflict and children’s (age three) externalizing behaviors was examined utilizing the Building Strong Families (BSF) data set. The study included 3,328 mothers and 3,148 fathers reporting on conflict behavior, and mother’s reports on children’s externalizing behaviors. My hypotheses indicated that the more constructive conflict, the less externalizing behaviors exhibited while the more destructive conflict, the more externalizing behaviors shown by the children. The majority of the literature demonstrated similar results to my hypotheses, however primarily focusing on mother’s conflict rather than the father’s conflict methods. Similarly, there was little focus on constructive conflict in the literature. Younger children (age three) were of interest for this study due to the lack of research involving these variables and this age group. The specific emotions theory was utilized to shape and inform my hypotheses. The results for this study supported my hypothesis concerning destructive conflict, but rejected the other discussing constructive conflict. Mothers’ correlations of conflict methods with externalizing behaviors were statistically significant while the fathers’ correlations were not. These analyses indicate further research of constructive conflict and its effects on younger children.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
dc.subjectconstructive conflicten
dc.subjectdestructive conflicten
dc.subjectexternalizing behaviorsen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
thesis.degree.levelBachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineFamily Studies and Human Developmenten
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorBarnett, Melissaen
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