Title of project: Prevalence and Willingness of Mothers in a Local Support Group to Ask Pharmacists for Pediatric Dosing of Over-the-Counter (OTC) Products: A Descriptive Study

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/614179
Title:
Title of project: Prevalence and Willingness of Mothers in a Local Support Group to Ask Pharmacists for Pediatric Dosing of Over-the-Counter (OTC) Products: A Descriptive Study
Author:
Adkins, Jacquelyn; Kittell, Katrina; Spencer, Jenene
Affiliation:
College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona
Issue Date:
2014
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
Specific Aims: To assess the prevalence of mothers asking pharmacists for pediatric dosing and mothers’ knowledge of pediatric OTC use. Subjects: Mothers with ≥ one child under 6 years old in a local mothers’ support group in Tucson. Methods: Questionnaires were sent out weekly for a month by the group’s listserv and social media website to determine the prevalence of mothers that ask pharmacists questions and assess their knowledge of OTC medications and what medical sources they use. Data on ages, ages of children, number of children, race/ethnicity, pharmacy visited, education, insurance coverage, and children’s chronic diseases were collected. Main Results: Twenty-six people responded. About 46% of the participants were 30 - 34 years old. Forty-six percent of mothers had 2 children; 42% had 1 child. About 54% of mothers have asked a pharmacist for pediatric OTC dosing. The reasons mothers gave for not asking pharmacists dosing information were that they hadn’t needed to ask (25%), they asked a doctor (16%), they used an online resource (8%), and they didn’t think about asking (8%). Three questions assessed OTC knowledge; 50% of participants got all questions correct, 38.5% got two questions correct, and 11.5% got one question correct. There wasn’t a difference in OTC knowledge and whether they asked a pharmacist questions (p=0.373). Conclusion: More than half of mothers asked pharmacists dosing information, but this percentage could still be higher. Fifty percent got all three questions right, 38.5% got two questions correct, and 11.5% of mothers got only 1 question correct.
Description:
Class of 2014 Abstract
Keywords:
Mothers; Support Group; Over-the-Counter (OTC); Dosing
Advisor:
Spencer, Jenene

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorSpencer, Jeneneen
dc.contributor.authorAdkins, Jacquelynen
dc.contributor.authorKittell, Katrinaen
dc.contributor.authorSpencer, Jeneneen
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-22T19:07:33Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-22T19:07:33Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/614179-
dc.descriptionClass of 2014 Abstracten
dc.description.abstractSpecific Aims: To assess the prevalence of mothers asking pharmacists for pediatric dosing and mothers’ knowledge of pediatric OTC use. Subjects: Mothers with ≥ one child under 6 years old in a local mothers’ support group in Tucson. Methods: Questionnaires were sent out weekly for a month by the group’s listserv and social media website to determine the prevalence of mothers that ask pharmacists questions and assess their knowledge of OTC medications and what medical sources they use. Data on ages, ages of children, number of children, race/ethnicity, pharmacy visited, education, insurance coverage, and children’s chronic diseases were collected. Main Results: Twenty-six people responded. About 46% of the participants were 30 - 34 years old. Forty-six percent of mothers had 2 children; 42% had 1 child. About 54% of mothers have asked a pharmacist for pediatric OTC dosing. The reasons mothers gave for not asking pharmacists dosing information were that they hadn’t needed to ask (25%), they asked a doctor (16%), they used an online resource (8%), and they didn’t think about asking (8%). Three questions assessed OTC knowledge; 50% of participants got all questions correct, 38.5% got two questions correct, and 11.5% got one question correct. There wasn’t a difference in OTC knowledge and whether they asked a pharmacist questions (p=0.373). Conclusion: More than half of mothers asked pharmacists dosing information, but this percentage could still be higher. Fifty percent got all three questions right, 38.5% got two questions correct, and 11.5% of mothers got only 1 question correct.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en
dc.subjectMothersen
dc.subjectSupport Groupen
dc.subjectOver-the-Counter (OTC)en
dc.subjectDosingen
dc.titleTitle of project: Prevalence and Willingness of Mothers in a Local Support Group to Ask Pharmacists for Pediatric Dosing of Over-the-Counter (OTC) Products: A Descriptive Studyen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.en
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