Evaluating Treatment Options for NAP1 Versus Non-NAP1 Strains of Clostridium Difficile Infection Among Pediatric Patients at an Academic Hospital.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/614169
Title:
Evaluating Treatment Options for NAP1 Versus Non-NAP1 Strains of Clostridium Difficile Infection Among Pediatric Patients at an Academic Hospital.
Author:
Smith, Amelia; Matthias, Kathyrn; Phan, Hanna
Affiliation:
College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona
Issue Date:
2014
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
Specific Aims: The incidence of Clostridium difficile (C. Diff) infections in pediatric patients has continually risen, which could be caused by the emergence of a hyper virulent strain, specifically NAP1/B1/027. The objectives of the study were to evaluate the incidence of strain type, compare treatment(s) prescribed, treatment duration, rate of infection recurrence based on strain and severity, rates of re-infection or recurrence, and treatment failures for patients less than 6 months and up to 18 years of age. Methods: A retrospective study of patients admitted to an academic medical center with detection of C. diff toxin was performed. Data analyses included descriptive and inferential statistics to examine demographics, strain type, infection severity, and treatment failure. Main Results: Fourty-five patients with C. Diff toxin detection were included in study analyses and the median age was 6.2 [0.31- 17.9 years]. Oral or intravenous metronidazole was prescribed as initial therapy in 89% of the patients. Strain type was available in 77% of patients, with NAP1/B1/027 detected in 31% of stool samples tested. Within 21 days after initial toxin detection, there was a 13% rate of clinical failure or death, although none directly associated with C. Diff. Within days 22 - 65 after initial toxin detection, there was a 16% rate of recurrence or reinfection. Initial therapy selection, therapy duration, and rate of recurrence or reinfection were not significantly associated with NAP1/B1/027 strain type. Conclusion: Despite variability in severity of infection, the majority of pediatric patients with C. Diff were treated with metronidazole and were infected with a non-B1/NAP1/027 strain.
Description:
Class of 2014 Abstract
Keywords:
treatment; NAP1 versus; non-NAP1; Clostridium difficile (C. Diff); pediatric
Advisor:
Matthias, Kathyrn; Phan, Hanna

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorMatthias, Kathyrnen
dc.contributor.advisorPhan, Hannaen
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Ameliaen
dc.contributor.authorMatthias, Kathyrnen
dc.contributor.authorPhan, Hannaen
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-22T18:31:36Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-22T18:31:36Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/614169-
dc.descriptionClass of 2014 Abstracten
dc.description.abstractSpecific Aims: The incidence of Clostridium difficile (C. Diff) infections in pediatric patients has continually risen, which could be caused by the emergence of a hyper virulent strain, specifically NAP1/B1/027. The objectives of the study were to evaluate the incidence of strain type, compare treatment(s) prescribed, treatment duration, rate of infection recurrence based on strain and severity, rates of re-infection or recurrence, and treatment failures for patients less than 6 months and up to 18 years of age. Methods: A retrospective study of patients admitted to an academic medical center with detection of C. diff toxin was performed. Data analyses included descriptive and inferential statistics to examine demographics, strain type, infection severity, and treatment failure. Main Results: Fourty-five patients with C. Diff toxin detection were included in study analyses and the median age was 6.2 [0.31- 17.9 years]. Oral or intravenous metronidazole was prescribed as initial therapy in 89% of the patients. Strain type was available in 77% of patients, with NAP1/B1/027 detected in 31% of stool samples tested. Within 21 days after initial toxin detection, there was a 13% rate of clinical failure or death, although none directly associated with C. Diff. Within days 22 - 65 after initial toxin detection, there was a 16% rate of recurrence or reinfection. Initial therapy selection, therapy duration, and rate of recurrence or reinfection were not significantly associated with NAP1/B1/027 strain type. Conclusion: Despite variability in severity of infection, the majority of pediatric patients with C. Diff were treated with metronidazole and were infected with a non-B1/NAP1/027 strain.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en
dc.subjecttreatmenten
dc.subjectNAP1 versusen
dc.subjectnon-NAP1en
dc.subjectClostridium difficile (C. Diff)en
dc.subjectpediatricen
dc.titleEvaluating Treatment Options for NAP1 Versus Non-NAP1 Strains of Clostridium Difficile Infection Among Pediatric Patients at an Academic Hospital.en_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.en
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