WHAT HAPPENS IN VAGUS: EFFECTS OF YOGIC BREATHING ON AUTONOMIC REGULATION OF HEART RATE EXPLORED WITH PHARMACOLOGICAL BLOCKADES

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/614163
Title:
WHAT HAPPENS IN VAGUS: EFFECTS OF YOGIC BREATHING ON AUTONOMIC REGULATION OF HEART RATE EXPLORED WITH PHARMACOLOGICAL BLOCKADES
Author:
SANOVA, ANNA ANDREA
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Heart rate variability (HRV) reflects dynamic variation in sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system (SNS and PNS) activity. The parasympathetic vagus nerve is responsible for HRV between 0.12 and 0.4 Hz, which is thought to index the capacity for effective coping, and is linked to physical and emotional well-being. Yogic breathing to increase vagal activity is often paced below 0.12 Hz (< 7.2 breaths per minute (BrPM)), where its impact HRV can be due to both sympathetic and parasympathetic mechanisms. Five healthy volunteers completed three pharmacological blockade sessions (placebo, sympathetic blockade with Esmolol, and parasympathetic blockade with Glycopyrrolate) about 48 hours apart, and during each session completed 11 Sudarshan Kriya Yogic breathing exercises at 4-9 BrPM. HRV was the lowest under Glycopyrrolate (p < 0.001), and there was no significant difference between placebo and sympathetic blockade with Esmolol. In addition, the spectral power of specific HRV frequencies was greatest at similar frequencies of breathing, a pattern prevented only by Glycopyrrolate. These findings suggest that heart rate is vagally influenced at all breathing rates, and that the SNS is not the mechanism by which slow breathing increases HRV.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
cardiac vagal control; heart rate variability; yogic breathing; respiratory sinus arrhythmia; Sudarshan Kriya Yoga
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
Bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Allen, John J.B.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleWHAT HAPPENS IN VAGUS: EFFECTS OF YOGIC BREATHING ON AUTONOMIC REGULATION OF HEART RATE EXPLORED WITH PHARMACOLOGICAL BLOCKADESen_US
dc.creatorSANOVA, ANNA ANDREAen
dc.contributor.authorSANOVA, ANNA ANDREAen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractHeart rate variability (HRV) reflects dynamic variation in sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system (SNS and PNS) activity. The parasympathetic vagus nerve is responsible for HRV between 0.12 and 0.4 Hz, which is thought to index the capacity for effective coping, and is linked to physical and emotional well-being. Yogic breathing to increase vagal activity is often paced below 0.12 Hz (< 7.2 breaths per minute (BrPM)), where its impact HRV can be due to both sympathetic and parasympathetic mechanisms. Five healthy volunteers completed three pharmacological blockade sessions (placebo, sympathetic blockade with Esmolol, and parasympathetic blockade with Glycopyrrolate) about 48 hours apart, and during each session completed 11 Sudarshan Kriya Yogic breathing exercises at 4-9 BrPM. HRV was the lowest under Glycopyrrolate (p < 0.001), and there was no significant difference between placebo and sympathetic blockade with Esmolol. In addition, the spectral power of specific HRV frequencies was greatest at similar frequencies of breathing, a pattern prevented only by Glycopyrrolate. These findings suggest that heart rate is vagally influenced at all breathing rates, and that the SNS is not the mechanism by which slow breathing increases HRV.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
dc.subjectcardiac vagal controlen
dc.subjectheart rate variabilityen
dc.subjectyogic breathingen
dc.subjectrespiratory sinus arrhythmiaen
dc.subjectSudarshan Kriya Yogaen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
thesis.degree.levelBachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorAllen, John J.B.en
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