Inpatient Pharmacist Intervention Helps Sustain Improved Rates of Baseline Metabolic Monitoring for Patients Initiated on Atypical Antipsychotics

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/614162
Title:
Inpatient Pharmacist Intervention Helps Sustain Improved Rates of Baseline Metabolic Monitoring for Patients Initiated on Atypical Antipsychotics
Author:
Butler, Phalyn; Goldie, Christa; Simonson, Caitlin; Goldstone, Lisa; Kennedy, Amy
Affiliation:
College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona
Issue Date:
2014
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
Specific Aims: The purpose of this study is to assess whether baseline rates of metabolic monitoring of scheduled atypical antipsychotics are sustained as a result of a pharmacist intervention. Methods: This study was a retrospective chart review assessing rates of metabolic monitoring two months after a pharmacist intervention that utilized a pharmacist-physician metabolic monitoring recommendation form was discontinued. Patients ages 18 years or older with orders for a scheduled atypical antipsychotic were included. Patients with orders for first-generation antipsychotics or who have orders for as needed atypical antipsychotics were excluded. Main Results: Data from the two month post intervention period was compared to those obtained during the pharmacist intervention. For the monitoring of hemoglobin A1c and fasting lipid panels, which improved during the pharmacist intervention, there was a non-statistically significant trend towards decreased monitoring. For hemoglobin A1c, the rates of monitoring decreased from 21.59% to 12.32% (p = 0.09). For fasting lipid panels, monitoring decreased from 39.77% to 28.99% (p = 0.125). Conclusion: A pharmacist intervention utilizing a recommendation form was effective in sustaining the improvement of baseline metabolic monitoring of personal history of diabetes and cardiovascular disease and monitoring of hemoglobin A1c and lipid panels. However, a trend towards decreased monitoring was observed in both the percentage of hemoglobin A1c and lipid panels ordered. Thus, continuing pharmacist intervention may be necessary in order to ensure that baseline metabolic monitoring for atypical antipsychotics occurs.
Description:
Class of 2014 Abstract
Keywords:
intervention; metabolic; antipsychotics; patients
Advisor:
Goldstone, Lisa; Kennedy, Amy

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorGoldstone, Lisaen
dc.contributor.advisorKennedy, Amyen
dc.contributor.authorButler, Phalynen
dc.contributor.authorGoldie, Christaen
dc.contributor.authorSimonson, Caitlinen
dc.contributor.authorGoldstone, Lisaen
dc.contributor.authorKennedy, Amyen
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-22T17:59:35Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-22T17:59:35Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/614162-
dc.descriptionClass of 2014 Abstracten
dc.description.abstractSpecific Aims: The purpose of this study is to assess whether baseline rates of metabolic monitoring of scheduled atypical antipsychotics are sustained as a result of a pharmacist intervention. Methods: This study was a retrospective chart review assessing rates of metabolic monitoring two months after a pharmacist intervention that utilized a pharmacist-physician metabolic monitoring recommendation form was discontinued. Patients ages 18 years or older with orders for a scheduled atypical antipsychotic were included. Patients with orders for first-generation antipsychotics or who have orders for as needed atypical antipsychotics were excluded. Main Results: Data from the two month post intervention period was compared to those obtained during the pharmacist intervention. For the monitoring of hemoglobin A1c and fasting lipid panels, which improved during the pharmacist intervention, there was a non-statistically significant trend towards decreased monitoring. For hemoglobin A1c, the rates of monitoring decreased from 21.59% to 12.32% (p = 0.09). For fasting lipid panels, monitoring decreased from 39.77% to 28.99% (p = 0.125). Conclusion: A pharmacist intervention utilizing a recommendation form was effective in sustaining the improvement of baseline metabolic monitoring of personal history of diabetes and cardiovascular disease and monitoring of hemoglobin A1c and lipid panels. However, a trend towards decreased monitoring was observed in both the percentage of hemoglobin A1c and lipid panels ordered. Thus, continuing pharmacist intervention may be necessary in order to ensure that baseline metabolic monitoring for atypical antipsychotics occurs.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en
dc.subjectinterventionen
dc.subjectmetabolicen
dc.subjectantipsychoticsen
dc.subjectpatientsen
dc.titleInpatient Pharmacist Intervention Helps Sustain Improved Rates of Baseline Metabolic Monitoring for Patients Initiated on Atypical Antipsychoticsen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.en
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