The Level of Accuracy in the Sixth Season of the Medical Television Show, House M.D.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/614159
Title:
The Level of Accuracy in the Sixth Season of the Medical Television Show, House M.D.
Author:
Barraclough, Jacqueline; Nguyen, NgocThuy-Grace; Apgar, David
Affiliation:
College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona
Issue Date:
2014
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
Specific Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate the level of accuracy of medical information presented in the sixth season of the popular prime time medical drama, House M.D. Methods: The study was a descriptive, retrospective assessment of twelve episodes in the sixth season of the medical television show, House M.D. Three parameters were compared to reliable medical sources: signs and symptoms, diagnostic procedures, and medical treatment for the one primary medical problem portrayed in each episode. Three researchers reviewed each episode independently and rated the accuracy of each parameter. The accuracy of each dependent variable was rated on a scale of one to four (most to least accurate, respectively). After discussion, a consensus rating was determined for all three variables for all twelve episodes. Main Results: The average accuracy scores for the signs and symptoms, diagnostic procedures, and medical treatments were 2.08, 2.58 (ie.,least accurate), and 1.5 (ie., most accurate), respectively. The average accuracy score across the three parameters was 2.06 (correct but somewhat unusual). The one-way ANOVA analysis on the variables revealed a statistically significant difference among the groups, with a p value of 0.003. The Tukey HSD test confirmed the statistically significant difference between diagnostic procedures and treatment (p = 0.002). Conclusion: The treatments portrayed in twelve episodes of season six were judged more accurate than signs and symptoms and diagnostic procedures. The average accuracy score of the three groups determined that the medical information presented in the episodes seemed to be correct but somewhat unusual.
Description:
Class of 2014 Abstract
Keywords:
Accuracy; House M.D.; Television Show; Sixth Season
Advisor:
Apgar, David

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorApgar, Daviden
dc.contributor.authorBarraclough, Jacquelineen
dc.contributor.authorNguyen, NgocThuy-Graceen
dc.contributor.authorApgar, Daviden
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-22T17:53:45Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-22T17:53:45Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/614159-
dc.descriptionClass of 2014 Abstracten
dc.description.abstractSpecific Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate the level of accuracy of medical information presented in the sixth season of the popular prime time medical drama, House M.D. Methods: The study was a descriptive, retrospective assessment of twelve episodes in the sixth season of the medical television show, House M.D. Three parameters were compared to reliable medical sources: signs and symptoms, diagnostic procedures, and medical treatment for the one primary medical problem portrayed in each episode. Three researchers reviewed each episode independently and rated the accuracy of each parameter. The accuracy of each dependent variable was rated on a scale of one to four (most to least accurate, respectively). After discussion, a consensus rating was determined for all three variables for all twelve episodes. Main Results: The average accuracy scores for the signs and symptoms, diagnostic procedures, and medical treatments were 2.08, 2.58 (ie.,least accurate), and 1.5 (ie., most accurate), respectively. The average accuracy score across the three parameters was 2.06 (correct but somewhat unusual). The one-way ANOVA analysis on the variables revealed a statistically significant difference among the groups, with a p value of 0.003. The Tukey HSD test confirmed the statistically significant difference between diagnostic procedures and treatment (p = 0.002). Conclusion: The treatments portrayed in twelve episodes of season six were judged more accurate than signs and symptoms and diagnostic procedures. The average accuracy score of the three groups determined that the medical information presented in the episodes seemed to be correct but somewhat unusual.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en
dc.subjectAccuracyen
dc.subjectHouse M.D.en
dc.subjectTelevision Showen
dc.subjectSixth Seasonen
dc.titleThe Level of Accuracy in the Sixth Season of the Medical Television Show, House M.D.en_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.en
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