The Effect of Follow-Up Phone Calls After Patient Discharge on 30-day Hospital Readmission Rates

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/614153
Title:
The Effect of Follow-Up Phone Calls After Patient Discharge on 30-day Hospital Readmission Rates
Author:
Fyfe, Kristen; Lee-Chan, Tiffany; Marrow, Heather; Cooley, Janet; Warholak, Terri
Affiliation:
College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona
Issue Date:
2014
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
Specific Aims: The objective of this study was to perform follow-up phone calls to patients after discharge to determine if it had a significant effect in lowering 30- day readmission rates. Methods: Men and women aged 18 years and older who provided informed consent participated in this prospective, pre-post study. The intervention consisted of a scripted follow-up phone call to each patient after discharge. At three to seven days post-discharge, a pharmacy student on an advanced pharmacy practice experience rotation at a teaching hospital called each patient discharged from a designated ward (Med/Surg I), which admits patients with a variety of conditions, such as liver cirrhosis, pneumonia, osteomyelitis, those who are uninsured, or those who require placement after discharge. Information was collected regarding prescription filling, understanding of medication(s), concerns regarding medications, and the community pharmacy he/she used to fill the discharge medications. The specified community pharmacy was then called to verify that the patient filled discharge medications at that pharmacy. The results were compared to the readmission rate in the same ward over the same time period one year prior to implementation of the intervention. Chi-square and descriptive analysis was used and the alpha a priori is 0.05. The institutional review board approved this study. Main Results: Of the 315 people contacted, a total of 89 people completed the survey (28% response rate) and 11 of these participants were readmitted at least once. There was no statistically significant difference between the participant readmission rate and the readmission rates of the total unique admission population of Med/Surg I in 2013 (χ2 = 1.206; p = 0.272). Conclusion: Follow-up phone calls did not significantly impact 30-day readmission rates; however, a downward trend was observed in the participant group.
Description:
Class of 2014 Abstract
Keywords:
follow-up; discharge; rates; readmission
Advisor:
Cooley, Janet; Warholak, Terri

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorCooley, Janeten
dc.contributor.advisorWarholak, Terrien
dc.contributor.authorFyfe, Kristenen
dc.contributor.authorLee-Chan, Tiffanyen
dc.contributor.authorMarrow, Heatheren
dc.contributor.authorCooley, Janeten
dc.contributor.authorWarholak, Terrien
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-22T18:26:17Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-22T18:26:17Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/614153-
dc.descriptionClass of 2014 Abstracten
dc.description.abstractSpecific Aims: The objective of this study was to perform follow-up phone calls to patients after discharge to determine if it had a significant effect in lowering 30- day readmission rates. Methods: Men and women aged 18 years and older who provided informed consent participated in this prospective, pre-post study. The intervention consisted of a scripted follow-up phone call to each patient after discharge. At three to seven days post-discharge, a pharmacy student on an advanced pharmacy practice experience rotation at a teaching hospital called each patient discharged from a designated ward (Med/Surg I), which admits patients with a variety of conditions, such as liver cirrhosis, pneumonia, osteomyelitis, those who are uninsured, or those who require placement after discharge. Information was collected regarding prescription filling, understanding of medication(s), concerns regarding medications, and the community pharmacy he/she used to fill the discharge medications. The specified community pharmacy was then called to verify that the patient filled discharge medications at that pharmacy. The results were compared to the readmission rate in the same ward over the same time period one year prior to implementation of the intervention. Chi-square and descriptive analysis was used and the alpha a priori is 0.05. The institutional review board approved this study. Main Results: Of the 315 people contacted, a total of 89 people completed the survey (28% response rate) and 11 of these participants were readmitted at least once. There was no statistically significant difference between the participant readmission rate and the readmission rates of the total unique admission population of Med/Surg I in 2013 (χ2 = 1.206; p = 0.272). Conclusion: Follow-up phone calls did not significantly impact 30-day readmission rates; however, a downward trend was observed in the participant group.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en
dc.subjectfollow-upen
dc.subjectdischargeen
dc.subjectratesen
dc.subjectreadmissionen
dc.titleThe Effect of Follow-Up Phone Calls After Patient Discharge on 30-day Hospital Readmission Ratesen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.en
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