Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/614151
Title:
Suboxone for Medically Assisted Treatment for Opioid Dependence
Author:
Cradick, Mary; DeGrote, Shannon; Marsall, Spencer; Warholak, Terri
Affiliation:
College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona
Issue Date:
2014
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
Specific Aims: To show that Suboxone is more effective than no MAT (Medically Assisted Treatment) in opioid dependence. Additionally, that Suboxone is as effective as methadone in MAT. Methods: This study was a retrospective chart review of probationer’s case files at The Pima County Adult Probation Office. Treatment groups included: Suboxone (n=16), methadone (n=15), and no MAT control group (n=15). The total sample size was 46 probationers. The primary dependent variables were the number of negative events and time to a negative event (i.e. missed/positive urinalysis, violation of terms of probation). The secondary outcome variables were the number of positive events and time to a positive event (i.e. finding employment, documented social/family improvement). Data analysis utilized chi-square for categorical data while t-tests were used for continuous data. Main Results: 46 probationers of Pima County with violations related to possession or use of an opioid substance were analyzed. No significant differences were found between Suboxone and placebo (no MAT) for any of the four outcomes (number of negative events p=0.82; time to first negative event p=0.41; number of positive events p=0.93; time to first positive event p=0.45). No significant differences were found between Suboxone and methadone as well (number of negative events p=0.34; time to first negative event p=0.52; number of positive events p=0.93; time to first positive event p=0.56). Conclusion: This study found no statistically significant differences between no MAT and Suboxone nor Suboxone and methadone. Differences in baseline characteristics between groups were found that could characterize the Suboxone group as being more severely ill.
Description:
Class of 2014 Abstract
Keywords:
Suboxone; MAT (Medically Assisted Treatment); Opioid Dependence
Advisor:
Warholak, Terri

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorWarholak, Terrien
dc.contributor.authorCradick, Maryen
dc.contributor.authorDeGrote, Shannonen
dc.contributor.authorMarsall, Spenceren
dc.contributor.authorWarholak, Terrien
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-22T18:20:57Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-22T18:20:57Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/614151-
dc.descriptionClass of 2014 Abstracten
dc.description.abstractSpecific Aims: To show that Suboxone is more effective than no MAT (Medically Assisted Treatment) in opioid dependence. Additionally, that Suboxone is as effective as methadone in MAT. Methods: This study was a retrospective chart review of probationer’s case files at The Pima County Adult Probation Office. Treatment groups included: Suboxone (n=16), methadone (n=15), and no MAT control group (n=15). The total sample size was 46 probationers. The primary dependent variables were the number of negative events and time to a negative event (i.e. missed/positive urinalysis, violation of terms of probation). The secondary outcome variables were the number of positive events and time to a positive event (i.e. finding employment, documented social/family improvement). Data analysis utilized chi-square for categorical data while t-tests were used for continuous data. Main Results: 46 probationers of Pima County with violations related to possession or use of an opioid substance were analyzed. No significant differences were found between Suboxone and placebo (no MAT) for any of the four outcomes (number of negative events p=0.82; time to first negative event p=0.41; number of positive events p=0.93; time to first positive event p=0.45). No significant differences were found between Suboxone and methadone as well (number of negative events p=0.34; time to first negative event p=0.52; number of positive events p=0.93; time to first positive event p=0.56). Conclusion: This study found no statistically significant differences between no MAT and Suboxone nor Suboxone and methadone. Differences in baseline characteristics between groups were found that could characterize the Suboxone group as being more severely ill.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en
dc.subjectSuboxoneen
dc.subjectMAT (Medically Assisted Treatment)en
dc.subjectOpioid Dependenceen
dc.titleSuboxone for Medically Assisted Treatment for Opioid Dependenceen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.en
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