Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/614139
Title:
Survey on Patient Safety and Pharmacist Working Conditions
Author:
Lee, Stephanie; Peterson, Kristin; Noble, Matthew; Herrier, Richard
Affiliation:
College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona
Issue Date:
2015
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
Objectives: To assess pharmacists’ perspectives on patient safety in relation to their working conditions. Methods: The survey was sent to 1000 pharmacists within Arizona. Results for the item evaluating pharmacists’ level of agreement with the statement regarding their employers providing a work environment optimized for safe patient care were compared to those from the Oregon Working Conditions Survey using Mann Whitney U. Mann Whitney U was also used to compare agreement between Arizona pharmacists who filled less than and more than 200 prescriptions per shift, and between Arizona community and hospital pharmacists. Chi-squared test was used to compare community pharmacists in Arizona and Oregon. A priori alpha level was 0.05 for all statistical tests. Results: Arizona pharmacists were significantly more likely than Oregon pharmacists to agree with the statement that their employer provided a work environment conducive to patient safety (p < 0.001). Arizona pharmacists who filled less than 200 prescriptions per shift agreed significantly more than those who filled more than 200 prescriptions per shift (p < 0.001). Hospital pharmacists were significantly more likely to agree with the patient safety statement than community pharmacists (p < 0.001). Conclusions: The pharmaceutical climate may play a role in the difference between Oregon and Arizona. With a lower percentage of chain/mass merchandiser community pharmacy respondents in Arizona, the overall agreement with the patient safety statement could have been influenced by practice type. Regardless, higher prescription volume still remains as a factor that can have potentially deleterious effects on optimization of patient safety.
Description:
Class of 2015 Abstract
Keywords:
Pharmacist; Working Conditions
Advisor:
Herrier, Richard

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorHerrier, Richarden
dc.contributor.authorLee, Stephanieen
dc.contributor.authorPeterson, Kristinen
dc.contributor.authorNoble, Matthewen
dc.contributor.authorHerrier, Richarden
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-22T17:14:15Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-22T17:14:15Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/614139-
dc.descriptionClass of 2015 Abstracten
dc.description.abstractObjectives: To assess pharmacists’ perspectives on patient safety in relation to their working conditions. Methods: The survey was sent to 1000 pharmacists within Arizona. Results for the item evaluating pharmacists’ level of agreement with the statement regarding their employers providing a work environment optimized for safe patient care were compared to those from the Oregon Working Conditions Survey using Mann Whitney U. Mann Whitney U was also used to compare agreement between Arizona pharmacists who filled less than and more than 200 prescriptions per shift, and between Arizona community and hospital pharmacists. Chi-squared test was used to compare community pharmacists in Arizona and Oregon. A priori alpha level was 0.05 for all statistical tests. Results: Arizona pharmacists were significantly more likely than Oregon pharmacists to agree with the statement that their employer provided a work environment conducive to patient safety (p < 0.001). Arizona pharmacists who filled less than 200 prescriptions per shift agreed significantly more than those who filled more than 200 prescriptions per shift (p < 0.001). Hospital pharmacists were significantly more likely to agree with the patient safety statement than community pharmacists (p < 0.001). Conclusions: The pharmaceutical climate may play a role in the difference between Oregon and Arizona. With a lower percentage of chain/mass merchandiser community pharmacy respondents in Arizona, the overall agreement with the patient safety statement could have been influenced by practice type. Regardless, higher prescription volume still remains as a factor that can have potentially deleterious effects on optimization of patient safety.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en
dc.subjectPharmacisten
dc.subjectWorking Conditionsen
dc.titleSurvey on Patient Safety and Pharmacist Working Conditionsen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.en
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.