Cosolvent Effect on Droplet Evaporation Time, Aerodynamic Particle Size Distribution, and Differential Throat Deposition for Pressurized Metered Dose Inhalers

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/614123
Title:
Cosolvent Effect on Droplet Evaporation Time, Aerodynamic Particle Size Distribution, and Differential Throat Deposition for Pressurized Metered Dose Inhalers
Author:
Matthew Grimes; Myrdal, Paul; Sheth, Poonam
Affiliation:
College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona
Issue Date:
2015
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
Objectives: To evaluate the in vitro performance of various pressurized metered dose inhaler (pMDI) formulations by cascade impaction primarily focusing on throat deposition, fine particle fraction (FPF), and mass-median aerodynamic diameter (MMADR) measurements Methods: Ten solution pMDIs were prepared with varying cosolvent species in either low (8% w/w) or high (20% w/w) concentration. The chosen cosolvents were either alcohol (ethanol, n-propanol) or acetate (methyl-, ethyl-, and butyl acetate) in chemical nature. All formulations used HFA-134a propellant and 0.3% drug. The pMDIs were tested by cascade impaction with three different inlets to determine the aerodynamic particle size distribution (APSD), throat deposition, and FPF of each formulation. Theoretical droplet evaporation time (DET), a measure of volatility, for each formulation was calculated using the MMADR. Results: Highly volatile formulations with short DET showed consistently lower throat deposition and higher FPF than their lower volatility counterparts when using volume-constrained inlets. However, FPF values were not significantly different for pMDI testing with a non-constrained inlet. The MMADR values generated with volume-constrained inlets did not show any discernible trends, but MMADR values from the non-constrained inlet correlated with DET. Conclusions: Formulations with shorter DET exhibit lower throat deposition and higher FPF, indicating potentially better inhalational performance over formulations with longer DET. There appear to be predictable trends relating both throat deposition and FPF to DET. The shift in MMADR values for volume-constrained inlets suggests that large diameter drug particles are preferentially collected in these inlets.
Description:
Class of 2015 Abstract
Keywords:
fine particle fraction (FPF),; mass-median aerodynamic diameter (MMADR); pressurized metered dose inhaler (pMDI); Inhalers
Advisor:
Myrdal, Paul; Sheth, Poonam

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorMyrdal, Paulen
dc.contributor.advisorSheth, Poonamen
dc.contributor.authorMatthew Grimesen
dc.contributor.authorMyrdal, Paulen
dc.contributor.authorSheth, Poonamen
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-22T16:39:17Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-22T16:39:17Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/614123-
dc.descriptionClass of 2015 Abstracten
dc.description.abstractObjectives: To evaluate the in vitro performance of various pressurized metered dose inhaler (pMDI) formulations by cascade impaction primarily focusing on throat deposition, fine particle fraction (FPF), and mass-median aerodynamic diameter (MMADR) measurements Methods: Ten solution pMDIs were prepared with varying cosolvent species in either low (8% w/w) or high (20% w/w) concentration. The chosen cosolvents were either alcohol (ethanol, n-propanol) or acetate (methyl-, ethyl-, and butyl acetate) in chemical nature. All formulations used HFA-134a propellant and 0.3% drug. The pMDIs were tested by cascade impaction with three different inlets to determine the aerodynamic particle size distribution (APSD), throat deposition, and FPF of each formulation. Theoretical droplet evaporation time (DET), a measure of volatility, for each formulation was calculated using the MMADR. Results: Highly volatile formulations with short DET showed consistently lower throat deposition and higher FPF than their lower volatility counterparts when using volume-constrained inlets. However, FPF values were not significantly different for pMDI testing with a non-constrained inlet. The MMADR values generated with volume-constrained inlets did not show any discernible trends, but MMADR values from the non-constrained inlet correlated with DET. Conclusions: Formulations with shorter DET exhibit lower throat deposition and higher FPF, indicating potentially better inhalational performance over formulations with longer DET. There appear to be predictable trends relating both throat deposition and FPF to DET. The shift in MMADR values for volume-constrained inlets suggests that large diameter drug particles are preferentially collected in these inlets.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en
dc.subjectfine particle fraction (FPF),en
dc.subjectmass-median aerodynamic diameter (MMADR)en
dc.subjectpressurized metered dose inhaler (pMDI)en
dc.subjectInhalersen
dc.titleCosolvent Effect on Droplet Evaporation Time, Aerodynamic Particle Size Distribution, and Differential Throat Deposition for Pressurized Metered Dose Inhalersen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.en
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