Prescriber Knowledge and Perception of Naloxone Use for Opioid Overdose Reversal among Intravenous Drug Users

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/614097
Title:
Prescriber Knowledge and Perception of Naloxone Use for Opioid Overdose Reversal among Intravenous Drug Users
Author:
Poist, Jennifer; Wu, Regina; Peralta, Lourdes; Slack, Marion
Affiliation:
College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona
Issue Date:
2015
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
Objectives: Evaluate prescriber knowledge on naloxone use for opioid overdose reversals in intravenous drug users. Interview prescribers on their perceptions about intravenous drug users, syringe access programs, and other related topics. Subjects: Prescribers and medical professionals in the State of Arizona. Methods: Medical facilities were contacted by email, fax, or telephone requesting for prescribers to complete the survey and return by email or fax, or call to schedule a face-to-face appointment. The respondents of the survey were kept anonymous and were permitted to answer the survey in free text. Surveys were sent to the 68 selected medical facilities at least twice during the study period. Results: All of the six respondents were male, of the respondents had at least 11 years experience, with two having >30 years. A majority practiced in rehab centers or worked with drug abuse patients, however the number of patients treated per week by respondent varies from 10-320. Also of note five of the six respondents had a family member or relative with an addiction to opioids. The respondents seem to be in support of a naloxone distribution program however it is difficult to draw any conclusions since the number of responses was low. Conclusions: It appears that prescribers have a favorable perception of naloxone use and support harm reduction strategies, however response rate was too low to make any definitive conclusions.
Description:
Class of 2015 Abstract
Keywords:
Naloxone; Opioid Overdose; Reversal; Drug Users; Intravenous
Advisor:
Slack, Marion

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorSlack, Marionen
dc.contributor.authorPoist, Jenniferen
dc.contributor.authorWu, Reginaen
dc.contributor.authorPeralta, Lourdesen
dc.contributor.authorSlack, Marionen
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-22T15:18:37Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-22T15:18:37Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/614097-
dc.descriptionClass of 2015 Abstracten
dc.description.abstractObjectives: Evaluate prescriber knowledge on naloxone use for opioid overdose reversals in intravenous drug users. Interview prescribers on their perceptions about intravenous drug users, syringe access programs, and other related topics. Subjects: Prescribers and medical professionals in the State of Arizona. Methods: Medical facilities were contacted by email, fax, or telephone requesting for prescribers to complete the survey and return by email or fax, or call to schedule a face-to-face appointment. The respondents of the survey were kept anonymous and were permitted to answer the survey in free text. Surveys were sent to the 68 selected medical facilities at least twice during the study period. Results: All of the six respondents were male, of the respondents had at least 11 years experience, with two having >30 years. A majority practiced in rehab centers or worked with drug abuse patients, however the number of patients treated per week by respondent varies from 10-320. Also of note five of the six respondents had a family member or relative with an addiction to opioids. The respondents seem to be in support of a naloxone distribution program however it is difficult to draw any conclusions since the number of responses was low. Conclusions: It appears that prescribers have a favorable perception of naloxone use and support harm reduction strategies, however response rate was too low to make any definitive conclusions.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en
dc.subjectNaloxoneen
dc.subjectOpioid Overdoseen
dc.subjectReversalen
dc.subjectDrug Usersen
dc.subjectIntravenousen
dc.titlePrescriber Knowledge and Perception of Naloxone Use for Opioid Overdose Reversal among Intravenous Drug Usersen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.en
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