Assessment of Pharmacists’ Self-Reported Preparedness to Provide Pharmacotherapy Services to Individuals with Psychiatric Disorders

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/614091
Title:
Assessment of Pharmacists’ Self-Reported Preparedness to Provide Pharmacotherapy Services to Individuals with Psychiatric Disorders
Author:
German, Alex; Johnson, Laura; Ybarra, Georgina; Warholak, Terri
Affiliation:
College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona
Issue Date:
2015
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
Objectives: Pharmacists’ level of training and experience in psychiatric pharmacy were compared for: 1) self-perceived preparedness to provide pharmacotherapy services; and 2) perceived barriers to providing services to individuals with psychiatric disorders. Methods: This study used data from an internet-based questionnaire. Respondents were divided into 2 groups: 1) completed the Arizona Pharmacy Association’s Psychiatric Certificate Program, and/or Board Certified in Psychiatric Pharmacy, and/or College of Psychiatric and Neurologic Pharmacists member, and/or completed a PGY2 psychiatric pharmacy residency; and 2) no specialized training/experience in psychiatric pharmacy. A Mann-Whitney U analysis was used to compare the scaled responses for each group. A Bonferroni alpha correction was use in the case of multiple tests. Results: Compared to pharmacists without training/experience in psychiatry (N = 235), respondents with specialized training/experience in psychiatry pharmacy (N = 38) reported more frequent interactions with psychiatric patients and provided more counseling/drug information, monitoring for adverse drug reactions, recommending non-pharmacological treatments, screening for treatment issues, and making therapeutic recommendations (p < 0.05). Trained pharmacists in psychiatry reported being more prepared to provide all pharmacotherapy services (p = 0.003), except in addressing non-adherence, utilizing online resources, and providing pharmacotherapy services to patients with attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder. They reported fewer barriers (α = 0.005) except for time to provide services, having a private consultation area, and reimbursement for patient care activities. Conclusions: This study found that responding pharmacists without psychiatric training/experience may need additional education/training post-graduation and that they perceive more barriers in providing services to this population.
Description:
Class of 2015 Abstract
Keywords:
Psychiatric Disorders; Self-Reported; Pharmacotherapy Services; Pharmacists’
Advisor:
Warholak, Terri

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorWarholak, Terrien
dc.contributor.authorGerman, Alexen
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Lauraen
dc.contributor.authorYbarra, Georginaen
dc.contributor.authorWarholak, Terrien
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-22T15:25:50Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-22T15:25:50Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/614091-
dc.descriptionClass of 2015 Abstracten
dc.description.abstractObjectives: Pharmacists’ level of training and experience in psychiatric pharmacy were compared for: 1) self-perceived preparedness to provide pharmacotherapy services; and 2) perceived barriers to providing services to individuals with psychiatric disorders. Methods: This study used data from an internet-based questionnaire. Respondents were divided into 2 groups: 1) completed the Arizona Pharmacy Association’s Psychiatric Certificate Program, and/or Board Certified in Psychiatric Pharmacy, and/or College of Psychiatric and Neurologic Pharmacists member, and/or completed a PGY2 psychiatric pharmacy residency; and 2) no specialized training/experience in psychiatric pharmacy. A Mann-Whitney U analysis was used to compare the scaled responses for each group. A Bonferroni alpha correction was use in the case of multiple tests. Results: Compared to pharmacists without training/experience in psychiatry (N = 235), respondents with specialized training/experience in psychiatry pharmacy (N = 38) reported more frequent interactions with psychiatric patients and provided more counseling/drug information, monitoring for adverse drug reactions, recommending non-pharmacological treatments, screening for treatment issues, and making therapeutic recommendations (p < 0.05). Trained pharmacists in psychiatry reported being more prepared to provide all pharmacotherapy services (p = 0.003), except in addressing non-adherence, utilizing online resources, and providing pharmacotherapy services to patients with attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder. They reported fewer barriers (α = 0.005) except for time to provide services, having a private consultation area, and reimbursement for patient care activities. Conclusions: This study found that responding pharmacists without psychiatric training/experience may need additional education/training post-graduation and that they perceive more barriers in providing services to this population.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en
dc.subjectPsychiatric Disordersen
dc.subjectSelf-Reporteden
dc.subjectPharmacotherapy Servicesen
dc.subjectPharmacists’en
dc.titleAssessment of Pharmacists’ Self-Reported Preparedness to Provide Pharmacotherapy Services to Individuals with Psychiatric Disordersen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.en
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