Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/614028
Title:
Basin Scale and Runoff Model Complexity
Author:
Goodrich, David Charles
Affiliation:
Department of Hydrology & Water Resources, The University of Arizona; Southwest Watershed Research Center
Publisher:
Department of Hydrology and Water Resources, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
Issue Date:
1990-06
Rights:
Copyright © Arizona Board of Regents
Collection Information:
This title from the Hydrology & Water Resources Technical Reports collection is made available by the Department of Hydrology & Atmospheric Sciences and the University Libraries, University of Arizona. If you have questions about titles in this collection, please contact repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
Distributed Rainfall-Runoff models are gaining widespread acceptance; yet, a fundamental issue that must be addressed by all users of these models is definition of an acceptable level of watershed discretization (geometric model complexity). The level of geometric model complexity is a function of basin and climatic scales as well as the availability of input and verification data. Equilibrium discharge storage is employed to develop a quantitative methodology to define a level of geometric model complexity commensurate with a specified level of model performance. Equilibrium storage ratios are used to define the transition from overland to channel -dominated flow response. The methodology is tested on four subcatchments in the USDA -ARS Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed in Southeastern Arizona. The catchments cover a range of basins scales of over three orders of magnitude. This enabled a unique assessment of watershed response behavior as a function of basin scale. High quality, distributed, rainfall -runoff data was used to verify the model (KINEROSR). Excellent calibration and verification results provided confidence in subsequent model interpretations regarding watershed response behavior. An average elementary channel support area of roughly 15% of the total basin area is shown to provide a watershed discretization level that maintains model performance for basins ranging in size from 1.5 to 631 hectares. Detailed examination of infiltration, including the role and impacts of incorporating small scale infiltration variability in a distribution sense, into KINEROSR, over a range of soils and climatic scales was also addressed. The impacts of infiltration and channel losses on runoff response increase with increasing watershed scale as the relative influence of storms is diminished in a semiarid environment such as Walnut Gulch. In this semiarid environment, characterized by ephemeral streams, watershed runoff response does not become more linear with increasing watershed scale but appears to become more nonlinear.
Keywords:
Runoff -- Mathematical models.; Rain and rainfall -- Mathematical models.; Hydrology -- Mathematical models.; Runoff -- Arizona -- Mathematical models.; Rain and rainfall -- Arizona -- Mathematical models.; Hydrology -- Arizona -- Mathematical models.
Series/Report no.:
Technical Reports on Natural Resource Systems, No. 91-010
Sponsors:
Many have contributed directly or indirectly to the research effort reported here. Special thanks to Dr. David A. Woolhiser. I am forever in his debt for his thoughtful guidance, gracious patience, and largess of time, insight and wisdom. Dr. Soroosh Sorooshian's acumen and discerning judgement has contributed greatly to this effort. Many staff members of the Aridland Watershed Management Research Unit of USDA -Agricultural Research Service (ARS), Tucson, Arizona have provided valuable knowledge, assistance and diligent collection of high quality hydrologic data. Special thanks are extended to Carl Unkrich, Tim Keefer, Roger Simanton and Fatima Lopez. Financial assistance during the course of my graduate work has been provided by the National Science Foundation via a Graduate Research Fellowship, the American Society of Civil Engineers and the Hydrology Section of the American Geophysical Union for a Research Fellowships, the U. S. Geological Survey, USDA - Agricultural Research Service, and the U. S. Department of Energy (Los Alamos National Laboratory). Preparation and distribution of this report was made possible by a NASA /EOS interdisciplinary investigation (Sorooshian and Huerte, 1989). Without this assistance this effort could not have been undertaken and I gratefully acknowledge this support.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGoodrich, David Charlesen
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-21T22:52:57Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-21T22:52:57Z-
dc.date.issued1990-06-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/614028-
dc.description.abstractDistributed Rainfall-Runoff models are gaining widespread acceptance; yet, a fundamental issue that must be addressed by all users of these models is definition of an acceptable level of watershed discretization (geometric model complexity). The level of geometric model complexity is a function of basin and climatic scales as well as the availability of input and verification data. Equilibrium discharge storage is employed to develop a quantitative methodology to define a level of geometric model complexity commensurate with a specified level of model performance. Equilibrium storage ratios are used to define the transition from overland to channel -dominated flow response. The methodology is tested on four subcatchments in the USDA -ARS Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed in Southeastern Arizona. The catchments cover a range of basins scales of over three orders of magnitude. This enabled a unique assessment of watershed response behavior as a function of basin scale. High quality, distributed, rainfall -runoff data was used to verify the model (KINEROSR). Excellent calibration and verification results provided confidence in subsequent model interpretations regarding watershed response behavior. An average elementary channel support area of roughly 15% of the total basin area is shown to provide a watershed discretization level that maintains model performance for basins ranging in size from 1.5 to 631 hectares. Detailed examination of infiltration, including the role and impacts of incorporating small scale infiltration variability in a distribution sense, into KINEROSR, over a range of soils and climatic scales was also addressed. The impacts of infiltration and channel losses on runoff response increase with increasing watershed scale as the relative influence of storms is diminished in a semiarid environment such as Walnut Gulch. In this semiarid environment, characterized by ephemeral streams, watershed runoff response does not become more linear with increasing watershed scale but appears to become more nonlinear.en
dc.description.sponsorshipMany have contributed directly or indirectly to the research effort reported here. Special thanks to Dr. David A. Woolhiser. I am forever in his debt for his thoughtful guidance, gracious patience, and largess of time, insight and wisdom. Dr. Soroosh Sorooshian's acumen and discerning judgement has contributed greatly to this effort. Many staff members of the Aridland Watershed Management Research Unit of USDA -Agricultural Research Service (ARS), Tucson, Arizona have provided valuable knowledge, assistance and diligent collection of high quality hydrologic data. Special thanks are extended to Carl Unkrich, Tim Keefer, Roger Simanton and Fatima Lopez. Financial assistance during the course of my graduate work has been provided by the National Science Foundation via a Graduate Research Fellowship, the American Society of Civil Engineers and the Hydrology Section of the American Geophysical Union for a Research Fellowships, the U. S. Geological Survey, USDA - Agricultural Research Service, and the U. S. Department of Energy (Los Alamos National Laboratory). Preparation and distribution of this report was made possible by a NASA /EOS interdisciplinary investigation (Sorooshian and Huerte, 1989). Without this assistance this effort could not have been undertaken and I gratefully acknowledge this support.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherDepartment of Hydrology and Water Resources, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en
dc.relation.ispartofseriesTechnical Reports on Natural Resource Systems, No. 91-010en
dc.rightsCopyright © Arizona Board of Regentsen
dc.sourceProvided by the Department of Hydrology and Water Resources.en
dc.subjectRunoff -- Mathematical models.en
dc.subjectRain and rainfall -- Mathematical models.en
dc.subjectHydrology -- Mathematical models.en
dc.subjectRunoff -- Arizona -- Mathematical models.en
dc.subjectRain and rainfall -- Arizona -- Mathematical models.en
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona -- Mathematical models.en
dc.titleBasin Scale and Runoff Model Complexityen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeTechnical Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Hydrology & Water Resources, The University of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.departmentSouthwest Watershed Research Centeren
dc.description.collectioninformationThis title from the Hydrology & Water Resources Technical Reports collection is made available by the Department of Hydrology & Atmospheric Sciences and the University Libraries, University of Arizona. If you have questions about titles in this collection, please contact repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
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