Patient Satisfaction with Pharmacist Intern Intervention and Consultation in Hormone Replacement Therapy

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/614016
Title:
Patient Satisfaction with Pharmacist Intern Intervention and Consultation in Hormone Replacement Therapy
Author:
Alam, Farhana; Semonche, Peter D.; Reed-Kane, Dana
Affiliation:
College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona
Issue Date:
2016
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
Objectives: Specific Aim #1: Assess no difference in patient satisfaction. Our working hypothesis is that there is no difference in satisfaction with follow-up calls in women receiving HRT from pharmacists or pharmacy intern students at Reed’s Compounding Pharmacy. Specific Aim #2: Assess patient satisfaction with follow-up calls from pharmacy student interns. Our working hypothesis is that women receiving HRT are satisfied with follow-up calls for their therapy when it is conducted by pharmacy student interns, which enhances proper treatment guidance and adherence. Methods: This study will be a descriptive, direct comparison study that will use data obtained through an online questionnaire consisting of the following: four questions determining the patient’s demographics and eighteen questions on patient satisfaction with follow-up calls from Reed’s Compounding Pharmacy with pharmacy student interns. Results: Of the estimated 60 patients sample size, only 31 questionnaires were completed. The largest proportion of patients was between the ages of 51 and 60 (58%). The length of therapy in participating women varied quite significantly with one-fourth of patients on HRT for 4-5 years or more (26%). The patient satisfaction of follow-up calls conducted by pharmacy intern students survey results indicated, in general, that patients agreed that they were satisfied with the service that they were receiving from the pharmacy interns. There was no disagreement with the items, the intern provides education that will help me understand how to take my medications, being pleased that the intern is following-up, having input on hormone therapy, and with the items regarding intern professionalism and intern knowledge. The greatest disagreement was with three items asking about comfort talking with either a female or male intern, and the item about paying extra to ensure follow-up calls. Results from this study were compared with results from five questions adapted using a questionnaire from DiMaggio et al. Note that this study used 7 response fields: strongly disagreed, somewhat disagreed, disagreed, no opinion, agreed, somewhat agreed, strongly agreed. Data from DiMaggio et al used 5 response fields: strongly disagreed, disagreed, no opinion, agreed, strongly agreed. Responses were grouped by strongly disagreed, somewhat disagreed, disagreed, and no opinion in one and strongly agreed, somewhat agreed, and agreed in the second. The data from both studies were compared by considering proportion of patients who agreed at some level with each item. There was no statistical difference between the two groups (p > 0.08); both groups showed a high level of agreement on the five satisfaction items. Conclusions: The women receiving hormone replacement therapy in this study were satisfied with follow-up calls from pharmacy student interns at Reed’s Compounding Pharmacy. There is no difference in satisfaction with follow-up calls in women receiving HRT from pharmacists or pharmacy student interns. In addition to satisfaction, women are satisfied with follow-up calls for their therapy when it is conducted by pharmacy student interns, which enhances proper treatment guidance and adherence.
Description:
Class of 2016 Abstract
Keywords:
Patient; Pharmacist Intern; Hormone Replacement Therapy
Advisor:
Reed-Kane, Dana

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorReed-Kane, Danaen
dc.contributor.authorAlam, Farhanaen
dc.contributor.authorSemonche, Peter D.en
dc.contributor.authorReed-Kane, Danaen
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-21T21:58:11Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-21T21:58:11Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/614016-
dc.descriptionClass of 2016 Abstracten
dc.description.abstractObjectives: Specific Aim #1: Assess no difference in patient satisfaction. Our working hypothesis is that there is no difference in satisfaction with follow-up calls in women receiving HRT from pharmacists or pharmacy intern students at Reed’s Compounding Pharmacy. Specific Aim #2: Assess patient satisfaction with follow-up calls from pharmacy student interns. Our working hypothesis is that women receiving HRT are satisfied with follow-up calls for their therapy when it is conducted by pharmacy student interns, which enhances proper treatment guidance and adherence. Methods: This study will be a descriptive, direct comparison study that will use data obtained through an online questionnaire consisting of the following: four questions determining the patient’s demographics and eighteen questions on patient satisfaction with follow-up calls from Reed’s Compounding Pharmacy with pharmacy student interns. Results: Of the estimated 60 patients sample size, only 31 questionnaires were completed. The largest proportion of patients was between the ages of 51 and 60 (58%). The length of therapy in participating women varied quite significantly with one-fourth of patients on HRT for 4-5 years or more (26%). The patient satisfaction of follow-up calls conducted by pharmacy intern students survey results indicated, in general, that patients agreed that they were satisfied with the service that they were receiving from the pharmacy interns. There was no disagreement with the items, the intern provides education that will help me understand how to take my medications, being pleased that the intern is following-up, having input on hormone therapy, and with the items regarding intern professionalism and intern knowledge. The greatest disagreement was with three items asking about comfort talking with either a female or male intern, and the item about paying extra to ensure follow-up calls. Results from this study were compared with results from five questions adapted using a questionnaire from DiMaggio et al. Note that this study used 7 response fields: strongly disagreed, somewhat disagreed, disagreed, no opinion, agreed, somewhat agreed, strongly agreed. Data from DiMaggio et al used 5 response fields: strongly disagreed, disagreed, no opinion, agreed, strongly agreed. Responses were grouped by strongly disagreed, somewhat disagreed, disagreed, and no opinion in one and strongly agreed, somewhat agreed, and agreed in the second. The data from both studies were compared by considering proportion of patients who agreed at some level with each item. There was no statistical difference between the two groups (p > 0.08); both groups showed a high level of agreement on the five satisfaction items. Conclusions: The women receiving hormone replacement therapy in this study were satisfied with follow-up calls from pharmacy student interns at Reed’s Compounding Pharmacy. There is no difference in satisfaction with follow-up calls in women receiving HRT from pharmacists or pharmacy student interns. In addition to satisfaction, women are satisfied with follow-up calls for their therapy when it is conducted by pharmacy student interns, which enhances proper treatment guidance and adherence.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en
dc.subjectPatienten
dc.subjectPharmacist Internen
dc.subjectHormone Replacement Therapyen
dc.titlePatient Satisfaction with Pharmacist Intern Intervention and Consultation in Hormone Replacement Therapyen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.en
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