Prescription Stimulant Medication Attitudes and Beliefs of Undergraduate Students Involved in Social Sororities

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/614014
Title:
Prescription Stimulant Medication Attitudes and Beliefs of Undergraduate Students Involved in Social Sororities
Author:
Rim, Carol; Ong, Nicholas; Goldstone, Lisa W.
Affiliation:
College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona
Issue Date:
2016
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
Objectives: To first educate undergraduates involved in social sororities about prescription stimulant medications and to evaluate the effectiveness of an educational intervention in influencing the attitudes and beliefs regarding prescription stimulant medication use of undergraduates involved in social sororities. Methods: The intervention, an educational session, was presented to undergraduates involved in social sororities. The questionnaire collected demographic data regarding gender, age, ethnicity, race, undergraduate year, grade point average, type of sorority member, history of an attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) diagnosis, and previous or current non-medical use of prescription stimulants. The participants’ attitudes and beliefs on nine statements regarding prescription stimulants were queried pre- and post-intervention using a four-point Likert scale ranging from strongly disagree to strongly agree. To analyze changes in attitudes and beliefs, Mann-Whitney test was used. Results: One hundred sixty-three sorority members participated in the study. The average age of participants was 19 years with the majority of respondents identifying as an active sorority member (81%) and in their first year of undergraduate study (69%). There was a statistically significant change in beliefs regarding the safety (p < 0.01) and health risks (p = 0.02) associated with prescription stimulants. There was no significant difference in topics relating to addiction, legal issues of taking someone else’s prescription medications, emotional and academic outcomes from the use of prescription stimulants. Conclusions: The educational program presented by pharmacy students was effective in changing the beliefs and attitudes regarding safety and health risks of prescription stimulants among undergraduate students involved in social sororities.
Description:
Class of 2016 Abstract
Keywords:
Prescription Stimulant; Sororities; Medication; Undergraduate
Advisor:
Goldstone, Lisa W.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorGoldstone, Lisa W.en
dc.contributor.authorRim, Carolen
dc.contributor.authorOng, Nicholasen
dc.contributor.authorGoldstone, Lisa W.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-21T21:52:00Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-21T21:52:00Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/614014-
dc.descriptionClass of 2016 Abstracten
dc.description.abstractObjectives: To first educate undergraduates involved in social sororities about prescription stimulant medications and to evaluate the effectiveness of an educational intervention in influencing the attitudes and beliefs regarding prescription stimulant medication use of undergraduates involved in social sororities. Methods: The intervention, an educational session, was presented to undergraduates involved in social sororities. The questionnaire collected demographic data regarding gender, age, ethnicity, race, undergraduate year, grade point average, type of sorority member, history of an attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) diagnosis, and previous or current non-medical use of prescription stimulants. The participants’ attitudes and beliefs on nine statements regarding prescription stimulants were queried pre- and post-intervention using a four-point Likert scale ranging from strongly disagree to strongly agree. To analyze changes in attitudes and beliefs, Mann-Whitney test was used. Results: One hundred sixty-three sorority members participated in the study. The average age of participants was 19 years with the majority of respondents identifying as an active sorority member (81%) and in their first year of undergraduate study (69%). There was a statistically significant change in beliefs regarding the safety (p < 0.01) and health risks (p = 0.02) associated with prescription stimulants. There was no significant difference in topics relating to addiction, legal issues of taking someone else’s prescription medications, emotional and academic outcomes from the use of prescription stimulants. Conclusions: The educational program presented by pharmacy students was effective in changing the beliefs and attitudes regarding safety and health risks of prescription stimulants among undergraduate students involved in social sororities.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en
dc.subjectPrescription Stimulanten
dc.subjectSororitiesen
dc.subjectMedicationen
dc.subjectUndergraduateen
dc.titlePrescription Stimulant Medication Attitudes and Beliefs of Undergraduate Students Involved in Social Sororitiesen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.en
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