Evaluation of Treatment and Outcomes in Infants and Children with Urinary Tract Infection

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/614007
Title:
Evaluation of Treatment and Outcomes in Infants and Children with Urinary Tract Infection
Author:
Nguyen, Amy; Deitering, Sarah; Phan, Hanna; Brandon, Megan; Matthias, Kathryn
Affiliation:
College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona
Issue Date:
2015
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
Objectives: In 2011, the American Academy of Pediatrics released an updated urinary tract infection guideline that addressed diagnosis, antibiotic treatment, and duration of therapy in children ages 2-24 months. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the appropriateness of antibiotic prescribing and compare outcomes between age groups. Methods: This retrospective chart review included patients aged 1 month through 12 years admitted to a regional academic medical center from January through July 2014 and diagnosed with UTI or pyelonephritis. Patients were identified using ICD-9 codes. Demographic information, antibiotic treatment, length of stay, and complications were collected and the chi square statistical test was used to compare results between age groups. Results: There were 104 patients included in this study. The most common bacteria cultured were Escherichia coli (85%). Ceftriaxone (71%) and cephalexin (30%) were the most commonly prescribed empiric and discharge antibiotic, respectively. Based on guideline recommendations and culture results, inappropriate antibiotic selection only occurred with 7% of the orders while inappropriate prescribing occurred 35% of the time. Readmission within 90 days occurred in 15% of patients aged 2-24 months (guideline age group) and in 14% of all other patients (P>0.05). Conclusions: There was no difference between age groups with respect to inappropriate antibiotic prescribing or complications for pediatric UTI treatment and inappropriate antibiotic dosing occurred more frequently than inappropriate selection. More research is necessary to assess the impact of the guidelines on prescribing practices and factors associated with inappropriate prescribing.
Description:
Class of 2015 Abstract
Keywords:
treatment; outcomes; urinary tract infection; children; infants
Advisor:
Phan, Hanna; Brandon, Megan; Matthias, Kathryn

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorPhan, Hannaen
dc.contributor.advisorBrandon, Meganen
dc.contributor.advisorMatthias, Kathrynen
dc.contributor.authorNguyen, Amyen
dc.contributor.authorDeitering, Sarahen
dc.contributor.authorPhan, Hannaen
dc.contributor.authorBrandon, Meganen
dc.contributor.authorMatthias, Kathrynen
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-21T22:33:49Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-21T22:33:49Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/614007-
dc.descriptionClass of 2015 Abstracten
dc.description.abstractObjectives: In 2011, the American Academy of Pediatrics released an updated urinary tract infection guideline that addressed diagnosis, antibiotic treatment, and duration of therapy in children ages 2-24 months. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the appropriateness of antibiotic prescribing and compare outcomes between age groups. Methods: This retrospective chart review included patients aged 1 month through 12 years admitted to a regional academic medical center from January through July 2014 and diagnosed with UTI or pyelonephritis. Patients were identified using ICD-9 codes. Demographic information, antibiotic treatment, length of stay, and complications were collected and the chi square statistical test was used to compare results between age groups. Results: There were 104 patients included in this study. The most common bacteria cultured were Escherichia coli (85%). Ceftriaxone (71%) and cephalexin (30%) were the most commonly prescribed empiric and discharge antibiotic, respectively. Based on guideline recommendations and culture results, inappropriate antibiotic selection only occurred with 7% of the orders while inappropriate prescribing occurred 35% of the time. Readmission within 90 days occurred in 15% of patients aged 2-24 months (guideline age group) and in 14% of all other patients (P>0.05). Conclusions: There was no difference between age groups with respect to inappropriate antibiotic prescribing or complications for pediatric UTI treatment and inappropriate antibiotic dosing occurred more frequently than inappropriate selection. More research is necessary to assess the impact of the guidelines on prescribing practices and factors associated with inappropriate prescribing.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en
dc.subjecttreatmenten
dc.subjectoutcomesen
dc.subjecturinary tract infectionen
dc.subjectchildrenen
dc.subjectinfantsen
dc.titleEvaluation of Treatment and Outcomes in Infants and Children with Urinary Tract Infectionen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.en
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