Effectiveness of Prophylactic Fluconazole at Low Doses for Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Patients

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/613995
Title:
Effectiveness of Prophylactic Fluconazole at Low Doses for Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Patients
Author:
Hunt, Lawrence Taylor; Riddle, John Zachary; McBride, Ali
Affiliation:
College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona
Issue Date:
2016
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate if fluconazole 200 mg is an acceptable alternative to the fluconazole 400 mg for fungal prophylaxis in allogenic hematopoietic stem cell patients. Lower fluconazole doses will decrease cost of therapy and may reduce adverse events associated with higher doses. Methods: This study was a retrospective chart review conducted at the Arizona Cancer Center. A total of 58 patients qualified for the study. Primary endpoints were number of days on fluconazole 200 mg and type and number of fungal infections that occurred within 1 year post transplant. Results: Out of the fifty-eight patients who qualified for the study, only eight patients had a breakthrough fungal infection while on 200 mg (13.7%) after one year. Three of those eight were identified as having systemic fungal infections (5.2%). Conclusions: Fluconazole 200 mg is a reasonable low-cost and low side effect alternative to fluconazole 400 mg for antifungal prophylaxis in allogenic hematopoietic stem cell patients.
Description:
Class of 2016 Abstract
Keywords:
Prophylactic Fluconazole; Low Doses; Stem Cell; Transplant Patients; Allogeneic Hematopoietic
Advisor:
McBride, Ali

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorMcBride, Alien
dc.contributor.authorHunt, Lawrence Tayloren
dc.contributor.authorRiddle, John Zacharyen
dc.contributor.authorMcBride, Alien
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-21T21:15:02Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-21T21:15:02Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/613995-
dc.descriptionClass of 2016 Abstracten
dc.description.abstractObjectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate if fluconazole 200 mg is an acceptable alternative to the fluconazole 400 mg for fungal prophylaxis in allogenic hematopoietic stem cell patients. Lower fluconazole doses will decrease cost of therapy and may reduce adverse events associated with higher doses. Methods: This study was a retrospective chart review conducted at the Arizona Cancer Center. A total of 58 patients qualified for the study. Primary endpoints were number of days on fluconazole 200 mg and type and number of fungal infections that occurred within 1 year post transplant. Results: Out of the fifty-eight patients who qualified for the study, only eight patients had a breakthrough fungal infection while on 200 mg (13.7%) after one year. Three of those eight were identified as having systemic fungal infections (5.2%). Conclusions: Fluconazole 200 mg is a reasonable low-cost and low side effect alternative to fluconazole 400 mg for antifungal prophylaxis in allogenic hematopoietic stem cell patients.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en
dc.subjectProphylactic Fluconazoleen
dc.subjectLow Dosesen
dc.subjectStem Cellen
dc.subjectTransplant Patientsen
dc.subjectAllogeneic Hematopoieticen
dc.titleEffectiveness of Prophylactic Fluconazole at Low Doses for Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Patientsen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.en
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