Verification of Non-English-Language Prescription Label Translations

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/613994
Title:
Verification of Non-English-Language Prescription Label Translations
Author:
Humed, Kammi G.; Olson, Kenneth T.; Cooley, Janet
Affiliation:
College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona
Issue Date:
2016
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
Objectives: To verify a set of translated medication labels in consultation with native speakers of non-English languages, specifically for this study: Amharic, Arabic, Chinese (Mandarin), Somali, Spanish, Tigrinya, and Vietnamese. Methods: Native speakers of target languages were recruited from academic and community organizations in the Tucson area. Participants were asked to review a set of translated directions and complete a survey regarding the validity and comprehensibility of the translations. In some cases, a short interview was used to clarify any comments or corrections made by the participants. Results: Surveys were completed by 23 participants, 12 men and 11 women, covering seven languages, with an uneven distribution between languages. Directions in Somali were the least problematic, with relatively strong agreement between respondents. Amharic directions were rated poorly and scored consistently worse than the overall average. Tigrinya had the most variation between respondents compared to other languages. Chinese, Spanish, and Vietnamese all received rather high scores, but analysis is complicated by a small sample size for each. Among responses to the open-ended questions, comments regarding word choice were the most common, for various reasons. Conclusions: We were able to validate some of the provided translations, but found that certain languages posed more problems than others, and these translations would need to undergo further review before they can be reliably used in clinical practice.
Description:
Class of 2016 Abstract
Keywords:
Verification; non-English-language; prescription label
Advisor:
Cooley, Janet

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorCooley, Janeten
dc.contributor.authorHumed, Kammi G.en
dc.contributor.authorOlson, Kenneth T.en
dc.contributor.authorCooley, Janeten
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-21T21:11:53Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-21T21:11:53Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/613994-
dc.descriptionClass of 2016 Abstracten
dc.description.abstractObjectives: To verify a set of translated medication labels in consultation with native speakers of non-English languages, specifically for this study: Amharic, Arabic, Chinese (Mandarin), Somali, Spanish, Tigrinya, and Vietnamese. Methods: Native speakers of target languages were recruited from academic and community organizations in the Tucson area. Participants were asked to review a set of translated directions and complete a survey regarding the validity and comprehensibility of the translations. In some cases, a short interview was used to clarify any comments or corrections made by the participants. Results: Surveys were completed by 23 participants, 12 men and 11 women, covering seven languages, with an uneven distribution between languages. Directions in Somali were the least problematic, with relatively strong agreement between respondents. Amharic directions were rated poorly and scored consistently worse than the overall average. Tigrinya had the most variation between respondents compared to other languages. Chinese, Spanish, and Vietnamese all received rather high scores, but analysis is complicated by a small sample size for each. Among responses to the open-ended questions, comments regarding word choice were the most common, for various reasons. Conclusions: We were able to validate some of the provided translations, but found that certain languages posed more problems than others, and these translations would need to undergo further review before they can be reliably used in clinical practice.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en
dc.subjectVerificationen
dc.subjectnon-English-languageen
dc.subjectprescription labelen
dc.titleVerification of Non-English-Language Prescription Label Translationsen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.en
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