Evaluation of Benzodiazepine Use in Adults at a Community Health Center

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/613992
Title:
Evaluation of Benzodiazepine Use in Adults at a Community Health Center
Author:
Nguyen, Huong; Sanchez, Wendy; Wang, Guan; Kennedy, Amy
Affiliation:
College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona
Issue Date:
2016
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
Objectives: To describe the patterns of benzodiazepine use at a community health center in adults and to identify common demographic factors and chronic conditions that are associated with an increased usage rate. Subjects: Patients 18 years and older who had been treated at El Rio Community Health Center with an active benzodiazepine prescription on file. Methods: Data were collected from patient charts using a data collection form. Assessment included current benzodiazepine patients were taking, concurrent use of opiates and/or antispasmotics, indication for benzodiazepine use, concurrent medications for anxiety, depression, or insomnia, and prescriber type. Demographic data on age, gender, race, ethnicity, insurance type, and use of tobacco or alcohol were also collected. Results: Data were collected on 102 patients currently taking a benzodiazepine; 60 patients (mean age = 61.2, SD = 13.6) had concurrent first-line therapy for anxiety, depression, or insomnia and 42 patients (mean = 61.1, SD = 13.6) did not. There were a significantly higher proportion of women taking a benzodiazepine with first-line therapy than without first-line therapy (88.3% vs. 71.4%; p = 0.031). Additionally, higher proportion of benzodiazepine was prescribed with first-line therapy for depression than other indications (p = 0.002). Conclusions: More patients were prescribed benzodiazepines with concurrent first-line therapy for depression than other indications such as anxiety, insomnia, or other panic disorders. For this reason, health care professionals should be aware of the patterns of benzodiazepine use and comply with current recommended practice guidelines.
Description:
Class of 2016 Abstract
Keywords:
Benzodiazepine; Adults; Community Health Center; chronic conditions
Advisor:
Kennedy, Amy

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorKennedy, Amyen
dc.contributor.authorNguyen, Huongen
dc.contributor.authorSanchez, Wendyen
dc.contributor.authorWang, Guanen
dc.contributor.authorKennedy, Amyen
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-21T21:46:42Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-21T21:46:42Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/613992-
dc.descriptionClass of 2016 Abstracten
dc.description.abstractObjectives: To describe the patterns of benzodiazepine use at a community health center in adults and to identify common demographic factors and chronic conditions that are associated with an increased usage rate. Subjects: Patients 18 years and older who had been treated at El Rio Community Health Center with an active benzodiazepine prescription on file. Methods: Data were collected from patient charts using a data collection form. Assessment included current benzodiazepine patients were taking, concurrent use of opiates and/or antispasmotics, indication for benzodiazepine use, concurrent medications for anxiety, depression, or insomnia, and prescriber type. Demographic data on age, gender, race, ethnicity, insurance type, and use of tobacco or alcohol were also collected. Results: Data were collected on 102 patients currently taking a benzodiazepine; 60 patients (mean age = 61.2, SD = 13.6) had concurrent first-line therapy for anxiety, depression, or insomnia and 42 patients (mean = 61.1, SD = 13.6) did not. There were a significantly higher proportion of women taking a benzodiazepine with first-line therapy than without first-line therapy (88.3% vs. 71.4%; p = 0.031). Additionally, higher proportion of benzodiazepine was prescribed with first-line therapy for depression than other indications (p = 0.002). Conclusions: More patients were prescribed benzodiazepines with concurrent first-line therapy for depression than other indications such as anxiety, insomnia, or other panic disorders. For this reason, health care professionals should be aware of the patterns of benzodiazepine use and comply with current recommended practice guidelines.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en
dc.subjectBenzodiazepineen
dc.subjectAdultsen
dc.subjectCommunity Health Centeren
dc.subjectchronic conditionsen
dc.titleEvaluation of Benzodiazepine Use in Adults at a Community Health Centeren_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.en
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