Evaluation of Adherence to Empiric Antibiotic Recommendations in Treatment of Diabetic Foot Infections

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/613983
Title:
Evaluation of Adherence to Empiric Antibiotic Recommendations in Treatment of Diabetic Foot Infections
Author:
Lee-Chu, Sue; Fann, Chyi-Jade; Kim, Caroline; Le, Larry; Matthias, Kathryn
Affiliation:
College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona
Issue Date:
2016
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
Objectives: 1. To compare appropriateness of therapy and the time it takes for appropriate empiric antibiotic therapy to be given from when patients are first admitted for treatment of diabetic foot infection. 2. To compare the time it takes for physicians to “streamline” therapies or switch from empiric antibiotic therapy to specific antibiotics after culture results are obtained 3. To Compare the incidence of readmission within 30 days to the hospital after initial discharge. Methods: In this IRB approved, retrospective study, antibiotic therapy prescribing patterns before and after the distribution of a health network specific empiric antibiotic reference material were compared in patients admitted for diabetic foot infection. Patients were excluded if no antibiotic therapy prescribed, if under the age of 18 years, or if admitted for less than 48 hours (including time spent in the emergency department). The following data were collected and analyzed between the two groups: number of appropriate antibiotic therapy administered, timing of appropriate therapies relative to when appropriate culture samples were obtained if applicable, time it takes to streamline antimicrobial therapy, and the incidence of 30-day readmission. Results: A total of 400 patients were evaluated with 17 pre-intervention and 10 post-intervention patients who meet the inclusion criteria. The pre- and post- intervention groups did not show significant difference in demographics except for comorbid conditions (p=0.055). Overall, there was no significant difference between the pre- and post-intervention group on appropriate empiric therapy given (p=0.382), timing to streamline therapy (p=0.4035), and readmission rates (p=0.401). Conclusions: The health network specific empiric antibiotic recommendations reference material did not influence the timing and appropriateness of empiric antibiotic therapy in treatment of diabetic foot infections and the patient 30-day readmission rates.
Description:
Class of 2016 Abstract
Keywords:
Empiric Antibiotic; Treatment; Diabetic; Foot Infections
Advisor:
Matthias, Kathryn

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorMatthias, Kathrynen
dc.contributor.authorLee-Chu, Sueen
dc.contributor.authorFann, Chyi-Jadeen
dc.contributor.authorKim, Carolineen
dc.contributor.authorLe, Larryen
dc.contributor.authorMatthias, Kathrynen
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-21T21:02:41Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-21T21:02:41Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/613983-
dc.descriptionClass of 2016 Abstracten
dc.description.abstractObjectives: 1. To compare appropriateness of therapy and the time it takes for appropriate empiric antibiotic therapy to be given from when patients are first admitted for treatment of diabetic foot infection. 2. To compare the time it takes for physicians to “streamline” therapies or switch from empiric antibiotic therapy to specific antibiotics after culture results are obtained 3. To Compare the incidence of readmission within 30 days to the hospital after initial discharge. Methods: In this IRB approved, retrospective study, antibiotic therapy prescribing patterns before and after the distribution of a health network specific empiric antibiotic reference material were compared in patients admitted for diabetic foot infection. Patients were excluded if no antibiotic therapy prescribed, if under the age of 18 years, or if admitted for less than 48 hours (including time spent in the emergency department). The following data were collected and analyzed between the two groups: number of appropriate antibiotic therapy administered, timing of appropriate therapies relative to when appropriate culture samples were obtained if applicable, time it takes to streamline antimicrobial therapy, and the incidence of 30-day readmission. Results: A total of 400 patients were evaluated with 17 pre-intervention and 10 post-intervention patients who meet the inclusion criteria. The pre- and post- intervention groups did not show significant difference in demographics except for comorbid conditions (p=0.055). Overall, there was no significant difference between the pre- and post-intervention group on appropriate empiric therapy given (p=0.382), timing to streamline therapy (p=0.4035), and readmission rates (p=0.401). Conclusions: The health network specific empiric antibiotic recommendations reference material did not influence the timing and appropriateness of empiric antibiotic therapy in treatment of diabetic foot infections and the patient 30-day readmission rates.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en
dc.subjectEmpiric Antibioticen
dc.subjectTreatmenten
dc.subjectDiabeticen
dc.subjectFoot Infectionsen
dc.titleEvaluation of Adherence to Empiric Antibiotic Recommendations in Treatment of Diabetic Foot Infectionsen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.en
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