Effect of Adherence to the GOLD Guidelines on Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Related Readmissions in a Community Hospital

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/613978
Title:
Effect of Adherence to the GOLD Guidelines on Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Related Readmissions in a Community Hospital
Author:
Binder, William; Clark, Scott; Hall, Edina; Salek, Ferena; Glover, Jon
Affiliation:
College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona
Issue Date:
2016
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
Objectives: To assess the relationship between adherence to the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) guidelines for the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations and the corresponding 30-day, all-cause readmissions rate in a community hospital. Methods: A retrospective chart review was conducted on patients admitted with the primary diagnosis of a COPD exacerbation. Medications administration records relevant to the GOLD guidelines were examined as separate independent variables in relation to a readmission within 30 days of discharge. Additional factors examined included: demographic data, resident of a long-term care facility, pre-index hospitalization, pulmonary consult, vaccines, length of stay (LOS), discharge medications, and follow-up appointments. Results: Electronic health records of 120 patients were reviewed and divided into non-readmitted patients (n = 65, mean age 73.4 ± 10.1 years), all-cause readmissions (n = 55, mean age 70.15 ± 9.69 years), and COPD-related readmissions (n = 21, mean age 70.7 ± 11.1 years). Patients with heart failure (p = 0.024), a LOS >5 days (p = 0.045), a pre-index hospitalization (p = 0.001), or who were long-term care residents (p = 0.024) experienced more all-cause readmissions. Females experienced less all-cause readmissions (p = 0.035). Significantly more patients with a pre-index hospitalization had a COPD-related readmission (p = 0.027). Lastly, adherence to the GOLD treatment parameters was not significantly different across all groups. Conclusions: COPD is a complex disease and adherence to the GOLD guidelines during an exacerbation is unlikely to significantly impact 30-day readmission rates.
Description:
Class of 2016 Abstract
Keywords:
chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD); Guidelines; Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD); Adherence
Advisor:
Hall, Edina; Salek, Ferena; Glover, Jon

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorHall, Edinaen
dc.contributor.advisorSalek, Ferenaen
dc.contributor.advisorGlover, Jonen
dc.contributor.authorBinder, Williamen
dc.contributor.authorClark, Scotten
dc.contributor.authorHall, Edinaen
dc.contributor.authorSalek, Ferenaen
dc.contributor.authorGlover, Jonen
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-21T20:51:50Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-21T20:51:50Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/613978-
dc.descriptionClass of 2016 Abstracten
dc.description.abstractObjectives: To assess the relationship between adherence to the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) guidelines for the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations and the corresponding 30-day, all-cause readmissions rate in a community hospital. Methods: A retrospective chart review was conducted on patients admitted with the primary diagnosis of a COPD exacerbation. Medications administration records relevant to the GOLD guidelines were examined as separate independent variables in relation to a readmission within 30 days of discharge. Additional factors examined included: demographic data, resident of a long-term care facility, pre-index hospitalization, pulmonary consult, vaccines, length of stay (LOS), discharge medications, and follow-up appointments. Results: Electronic health records of 120 patients were reviewed and divided into non-readmitted patients (n = 65, mean age 73.4 ± 10.1 years), all-cause readmissions (n = 55, mean age 70.15 ± 9.69 years), and COPD-related readmissions (n = 21, mean age 70.7 ± 11.1 years). Patients with heart failure (p = 0.024), a LOS >5 days (p = 0.045), a pre-index hospitalization (p = 0.001), or who were long-term care residents (p = 0.024) experienced more all-cause readmissions. Females experienced less all-cause readmissions (p = 0.035). Significantly more patients with a pre-index hospitalization had a COPD-related readmission (p = 0.027). Lastly, adherence to the GOLD treatment parameters was not significantly different across all groups. Conclusions: COPD is a complex disease and adherence to the GOLD guidelines during an exacerbation is unlikely to significantly impact 30-day readmission rates.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en
dc.subjectchronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)en
dc.subjectGuidelinesen
dc.subjectGlobal Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD)en
dc.subjectAdherenceen
dc.titleEffect of Adherence to the GOLD Guidelines on Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Related Readmissions in a Community Hospitalen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.en
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