Rattlesnake Envenomation Demographic and Situational Statistics: a Retrospective Database Analysis 2002-2014

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/613972
Title:
Rattlesnake Envenomation Demographic and Situational Statistics: a Retrospective Database Analysis 2002-2014
Author:
Reilly, Jessica; Robertson, Morgan; Molina, Deanna; Boesen, Keith
Affiliation:
College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona
Issue Date:
2016
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
Objectives: The purpose of this study was to assess trends in the anatomical bite location, circumstances, and legitimacy of rattlesnake envenomations managed by the Arizona Poison and Drug Information Center (APDIC) between the years of 2002 to 2014. Methods: The Institutional Review Board approved this retrospective database analysis in which deidentified patient case information was extracted from the APDIC electronic medical record database. Descriptive and demographic variables collected included: age, gender, anatomical bite location, circumstance, and alcohol involvement. Variables were analyzed by student researchers to determine the legitimacy. Researchers compared demographic variables by year and month to assess for trends. Results: A total of 1,738 rattlesnake envenomations were analyzed for the 13 year study period. The number of cases per year varied, but not significantly, p=0.069. A statistically significant (p<0.005) upward trend in average age occurred. No significant difference in cases involving females was found between study years (p=0.171). Alcohol involvement was not statistically significant, p=0.46. An upward trend (p<0.005) in legitimate rattlesnake envenomations was demonstrated. Conclusions: Envenomations from 2002 to 2014, showed an upward trend in age, but similar distribution of gender. An increasing number of envenomations were determined to be legitimate, possibly related to the increasing number occurring to the foot/ankle, as well as the increasing number related to gardening and walking outside/taking out the trash. This trend may also be due to the lack of adequate data related to alcohol involvement.
Description:
Class of 2016 Abstract and Report
Keywords:
Rattlesnake; Envenomation; Statistics; retrospective database; analysis
Advisor:
Boesen, Keith

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorBoesen, Keithen
dc.contributor.authorReilly, Jessicaen
dc.contributor.authorRobertson, Morganen
dc.contributor.authorMolina, Deannaen
dc.contributor.authorBoesen, Keithen
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-21T20:25:17Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-21T20:25:17Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/613972-
dc.descriptionClass of 2016 Abstract and Reporten
dc.description.abstractObjectives: The purpose of this study was to assess trends in the anatomical bite location, circumstances, and legitimacy of rattlesnake envenomations managed by the Arizona Poison and Drug Information Center (APDIC) between the years of 2002 to 2014. Methods: The Institutional Review Board approved this retrospective database analysis in which deidentified patient case information was extracted from the APDIC electronic medical record database. Descriptive and demographic variables collected included: age, gender, anatomical bite location, circumstance, and alcohol involvement. Variables were analyzed by student researchers to determine the legitimacy. Researchers compared demographic variables by year and month to assess for trends. Results: A total of 1,738 rattlesnake envenomations were analyzed for the 13 year study period. The number of cases per year varied, but not significantly, p=0.069. A statistically significant (p<0.005) upward trend in average age occurred. No significant difference in cases involving females was found between study years (p=0.171). Alcohol involvement was not statistically significant, p=0.46. An upward trend (p<0.005) in legitimate rattlesnake envenomations was demonstrated. Conclusions: Envenomations from 2002 to 2014, showed an upward trend in age, but similar distribution of gender. An increasing number of envenomations were determined to be legitimate, possibly related to the increasing number occurring to the foot/ankle, as well as the increasing number related to gardening and walking outside/taking out the trash. This trend may also be due to the lack of adequate data related to alcohol involvement.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en
dc.subjectRattlesnakeen
dc.subjectEnvenomationen
dc.subjectStatisticsen
dc.subjectretrospective databaseen
dc.subjectanalysisen
dc.titleRattlesnake Envenomation Demographic and Situational Statistics: a Retrospective Database Analysis 2002-2014en_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.en
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