The Perception of Patient Satisfaction among Public Health and Pharmacy graduate students: A Retrospective Analysis

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/613969
Title:
The Perception of Patient Satisfaction among Public Health and Pharmacy graduate students: A Retrospective Analysis
Author:
Obeso, Chris; Phan, Hoang; Ho, Tan; Urbine, Terry
Affiliation:
College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona
Issue Date:
2016
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
Objectives: To explore the difference in patient satisfaction with pharmacy services between Public Health and Pharmacy students. Methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of the results of a 20-item questionnaire regarding patient satisfaction with community pharmacy services that was administered to pharmacy and public health graduate students at the University of Arizona. Pharmacy students (n = 95) and Public Health students (n = 67) completed the questionnaire and a Chi Square test was utilized to compare the results. Scores of 4 and 5 (Very Good and Excellent, respectively) were compared against 1, 2, and 3 (Poor, Fair, and Good, respectively). Questions were stratified into domains of “Friendly Explanation” and “Managing Therapy.” Results: Sixty-two percent of pharmacy students answered “Excellent” and “Very Good” on all 20 questions compared to 37% of public health students (p<0.001). In the “Friendly Explanation” domain, 73% of pharmacy students answered “Excellent” and “Very Good” compared to 57% of public health students (p<0.001). The “Managing Therapy” domain also yielded a higher percentage of satisfied pharmacy students compared to public health students (48% vs 36%, p<0.001). Areas with the highest degree of difference involved availability of the pharmacist, professionalism of pharmacy staff, and promptness of pharmacy services. Conclusions: Pharmacy students were more satisfied with pharmacy services than public health students. Increasing the availability of the pharmacist to answer patient questions, improving professionalism of staff, and providing prompt services may improve patient satisfaction with community pharmacy services among the general public.
Description:
Class of 2016 Abstract
Keywords:
Public Health; Satisfaction; Pharmacy; Graduate Students; Retrospective Analysis
Advisor:
Urbine, Terry

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorUrbine, Terryen
dc.contributor.authorObeso, Chrisen
dc.contributor.authorPhan, Hoangen
dc.contributor.authorHo, Tanen
dc.contributor.authorUrbine, Terryen
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-21T20:16:49Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-21T20:16:49Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/613969-
dc.descriptionClass of 2016 Abstracten
dc.description.abstractObjectives: To explore the difference in patient satisfaction with pharmacy services between Public Health and Pharmacy students. Methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of the results of a 20-item questionnaire regarding patient satisfaction with community pharmacy services that was administered to pharmacy and public health graduate students at the University of Arizona. Pharmacy students (n = 95) and Public Health students (n = 67) completed the questionnaire and a Chi Square test was utilized to compare the results. Scores of 4 and 5 (Very Good and Excellent, respectively) were compared against 1, 2, and 3 (Poor, Fair, and Good, respectively). Questions were stratified into domains of “Friendly Explanation” and “Managing Therapy.” Results: Sixty-two percent of pharmacy students answered “Excellent” and “Very Good” on all 20 questions compared to 37% of public health students (p<0.001). In the “Friendly Explanation” domain, 73% of pharmacy students answered “Excellent” and “Very Good” compared to 57% of public health students (p<0.001). The “Managing Therapy” domain also yielded a higher percentage of satisfied pharmacy students compared to public health students (48% vs 36%, p<0.001). Areas with the highest degree of difference involved availability of the pharmacist, professionalism of pharmacy staff, and promptness of pharmacy services. Conclusions: Pharmacy students were more satisfied with pharmacy services than public health students. Increasing the availability of the pharmacist to answer patient questions, improving professionalism of staff, and providing prompt services may improve patient satisfaction with community pharmacy services among the general public.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en
dc.subjectPublic Healthen
dc.subjectSatisfactionen
dc.subjectPharmacyen
dc.subjectGraduate Studentsen
dc.subjectRetrospective Analysisen
dc.titleThe Perception of Patient Satisfaction among Public Health and Pharmacy graduate students: A Retrospective Analysisen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.en
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.