Evaluation of Newer Drug Therapies for Hepatitis C at a Specialty Pharmacy

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/613967
Title:
Evaluation of Newer Drug Therapies for Hepatitis C at a Specialty Pharmacy
Author:
Garfunkel, Michelle; Hoehn, David; Thompson, Kayleen; Mathews, Kelly; Patel, Sarjit
Affiliation:
College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona
Issue Date:
2016
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
Objectives: To compare the SVR12 rates of newer hepatitis C therapies, approved between November 2013 and December 2014, in patients at Avella Specialty Pharmacy to SVR12 rates from published literature. Insurance coverage rates will be compared to determine a difference among insurances. Methods: Data were collected electronically from patient charts utilizing the existing computer system and manually through chart review. A complete data collection form in excel compiled the collected data and included the SVR12 rates by therapy, and sub-analysis data such as demographic and descriptive variables. Therapies included Harvoni, Olysio + Sovaldi ± Ribavirin (RBV), Viekira Pak ± RBV, or Sovaldi + RBV. Demographic and descriptive variables included gender, medical insurance, hepatitis C genotype, fibrosis score, treatment-experienced, treatment-naïve, and adverse effects. Insurance coverage rates were also collected through a separate electronic report. Results: A total of 578 patients were included in the analysis of SVR12 (mean age = 59, 60% male). There were 50% of patients with genotype 1a, 18% had cirrhosis, and 60% were treatment-naïve. The overall SVR12 rate achieved by patients at Avella was not significantly different from published clinical trials (91% vs 91%, p = 0.75). Data for coverage rates included a total of 6,284 patients and revealed that Medicare had the highest coverage rate (85%) while Medicaid had the lowest (30%). Conclusions: Newer hepatitis C therapies used in a real world setting had similar SVR12 rates to published literature. Medicaid had a lower coverage rate compared to Medicare and commercial insurances while Medicare had the highest coverage rate.
Description:
Class of 2016 Abstract
Keywords:
drug therapies; hepatitis C; pharmacy
Advisor:
Mathews, Kelly; Patel, Sarjit

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorMathews, Kellyen
dc.contributor.advisorPatel, Sarjiten
dc.contributor.authorGarfunkel, Michelleen
dc.contributor.authorHoehn, Daviden
dc.contributor.authorThompson, Kayleenen
dc.contributor.authorMathews, Kellyen
dc.contributor.authorPatel, Sarjiten
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-21T20:09:24Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-21T20:09:24Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/613967-
dc.descriptionClass of 2016 Abstracten
dc.description.abstractObjectives: To compare the SVR12 rates of newer hepatitis C therapies, approved between November 2013 and December 2014, in patients at Avella Specialty Pharmacy to SVR12 rates from published literature. Insurance coverage rates will be compared to determine a difference among insurances. Methods: Data were collected electronically from patient charts utilizing the existing computer system and manually through chart review. A complete data collection form in excel compiled the collected data and included the SVR12 rates by therapy, and sub-analysis data such as demographic and descriptive variables. Therapies included Harvoni, Olysio + Sovaldi ± Ribavirin (RBV), Viekira Pak ± RBV, or Sovaldi + RBV. Demographic and descriptive variables included gender, medical insurance, hepatitis C genotype, fibrosis score, treatment-experienced, treatment-naïve, and adverse effects. Insurance coverage rates were also collected through a separate electronic report. Results: A total of 578 patients were included in the analysis of SVR12 (mean age = 59, 60% male). There were 50% of patients with genotype 1a, 18% had cirrhosis, and 60% were treatment-naïve. The overall SVR12 rate achieved by patients at Avella was not significantly different from published clinical trials (91% vs 91%, p = 0.75). Data for coverage rates included a total of 6,284 patients and revealed that Medicare had the highest coverage rate (85%) while Medicaid had the lowest (30%). Conclusions: Newer hepatitis C therapies used in a real world setting had similar SVR12 rates to published literature. Medicaid had a lower coverage rate compared to Medicare and commercial insurances while Medicare had the highest coverage rate.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en
dc.subjectdrug therapiesen
dc.subjecthepatitis Cen
dc.subjectpharmacyen
dc.titleEvaluation of Newer Drug Therapies for Hepatitis C at a Specialty Pharmacyen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.en
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