Accuracy of Medical Information in the Seventh Season of the Medical Television show House, M.D

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/613965
Title:
Accuracy of Medical Information in the Seventh Season of the Medical Television show House, M.D
Author:
Foote, Kristy; Marciano, Jackelyn; Pellerito, Joseph; Apgar, David; Armstrong, Edward; Warholak, Terri
Affiliation:
College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona
Issue Date:
2016
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
Objectives: To evaluate the level of accuracy of medical information presented in the seventh season of the medical drama, House M.D. To assess the accuracy of the presentation, diagnostic procedures and treatment presented in season seven. Methods: A descriptive, retrospective assessment of the accuracy of all the episodes of the seventh season of House M.D. Three reviewers independently rated the accuracy (on a scale of one to four) for the presenting signs and symptoms, diagnostic procedures, and treatment in each episode. A rating of one meant a correct and usual representation while a rating of two indicated a correct but somewhat unusual representation. A three was given for a correct but extremely unusual representation and a rating of four indicated an incorrect representation. Each researcher independently rated the episodes, and an average for each rating was used for analysis. Results: Results of the ANOVA test demonstrated no statistically significance differences between the three dependent variables (p=0.0782), therefore the Tukey HSD post-hoc test was unnecessary. The average rating for the treatment variable was 2.17 (±1.19), whereas the average ratings for the signs and symptoms and diagnosis variables were 2.74 (±0.92), and 2.87 (±1.14), respectively. The ratings for the treatment variable were more accurate compared to the other two variables. Conclusions: All three dependent variables observed in season seven of House, MD were similar in regards to accuracy falling between a rating of 2.0-3.0 representing a correct but somewhat unusual to a correct and extremely unusual representation.
Description:
Class of 2016 Abstract
Keywords:
Television show; House, M.D; Medical information; Seventh Season
Advisor:
Apgar, David; Armstrong, Edward; Warholak, Terri

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorApgar, Daviden
dc.contributor.advisorArmstrong, Edwarden
dc.contributor.advisorWarholak, Terrien
dc.contributor.authorFoote, Kristyen
dc.contributor.authorMarciano, Jackelynen
dc.contributor.authorPellerito, Josephen
dc.contributor.authorApgar, Daviden
dc.contributor.authorArmstrong, Edwarden
dc.contributor.authorWarholak, Terrien
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-21T20:05:33Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-21T20:05:33Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/613965-
dc.descriptionClass of 2016 Abstracten
dc.description.abstractObjectives: To evaluate the level of accuracy of medical information presented in the seventh season of the medical drama, House M.D. To assess the accuracy of the presentation, diagnostic procedures and treatment presented in season seven. Methods: A descriptive, retrospective assessment of the accuracy of all the episodes of the seventh season of House M.D. Three reviewers independently rated the accuracy (on a scale of one to four) for the presenting signs and symptoms, diagnostic procedures, and treatment in each episode. A rating of one meant a correct and usual representation while a rating of two indicated a correct but somewhat unusual representation. A three was given for a correct but extremely unusual representation and a rating of four indicated an incorrect representation. Each researcher independently rated the episodes, and an average for each rating was used for analysis. Results: Results of the ANOVA test demonstrated no statistically significance differences between the three dependent variables (p=0.0782), therefore the Tukey HSD post-hoc test was unnecessary. The average rating for the treatment variable was 2.17 (±1.19), whereas the average ratings for the signs and symptoms and diagnosis variables were 2.74 (±0.92), and 2.87 (±1.14), respectively. The ratings for the treatment variable were more accurate compared to the other two variables. Conclusions: All three dependent variables observed in season seven of House, MD were similar in regards to accuracy falling between a rating of 2.0-3.0 representing a correct but somewhat unusual to a correct and extremely unusual representation.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en
dc.subjectTelevision showen
dc.subjectHouse, M.Den
dc.subjectMedical informationen
dc.subjectSeventh Seasonen
dc.titleAccuracy of Medical Information in the Seventh Season of the Medical Television show House, M.Den_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.en
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