Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/613835
Title:
Commercial-Off-The-Shelf Infrastructure for a 1U CubeSat
Author:
Hubbell, Reed Matthew; Tsang, Alfie C.; Bossler, Benjamin Macleod; Whitman, Dean Michael; Williams, Kaitlyn Elizabeth; Wirth, Steven Edward
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
CubeSat nanosatellites use a standardized chassis format to permit low-cost space missions through the use of components and launch systems that are more commonly available to small projects. However, many CubeSat missions are still quite expensive due to the use of costly "space-rated" components. This senior design project focused on the development of a lower cost (sub-$5,000) CubeSat through the use of commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) components and 3-D printing. The design team successfully implemented a variety of COTS parts (including a Teensy 3.2 micromodem, Yaesu HAM radio handset, and more) in addition to several significant 3-D printed internal components to develop a functional proof-of-concept prototype by the conclusion of the project cycle. As part of this process, the cost-reduction goals were met. At UA Senior Design Day 2016, the final prototype was able to operate on battery power to gather orientation, acceleration, and temperature data from its internal sensor, process that data, and communicate it through the satellite's radio to a nearby ground station, which then displayed the data on a computer monitor. This project was sponsored by Raytheon Missile Systems.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.E.
Degree Level:
Bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Mechanical Engineering
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Pine, Gerald

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleCommercial-Off-The-Shelf Infrastructure for a 1U CubeSaten_US
dc.creatorHubbell, Reed Matthewen
dc.creatorTsang, Alfie C.en
dc.creatorBossler, Benjamin Macleoden
dc.creatorWhitman, Dean Michaelen
dc.creatorWilliams, Kaitlyn Elizabethen
dc.creatorWirth, Steven Edwarden
dc.contributor.authorHubbell, Reed Matthewen
dc.contributor.authorTsang, Alfie C.en
dc.contributor.authorBossler, Benjamin Macleoden
dc.contributor.authorWhitman, Dean Michaelen
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Kaitlyn Elizabethen
dc.contributor.authorWirth, Steven Edwarden
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractCubeSat nanosatellites use a standardized chassis format to permit low-cost space missions through the use of components and launch systems that are more commonly available to small projects. However, many CubeSat missions are still quite expensive due to the use of costly "space-rated" components. This senior design project focused on the development of a lower cost (sub-$5,000) CubeSat through the use of commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) components and 3-D printing. The design team successfully implemented a variety of COTS parts (including a Teensy 3.2 micromodem, Yaesu HAM radio handset, and more) in addition to several significant 3-D printed internal components to develop a functional proof-of-concept prototype by the conclusion of the project cycle. As part of this process, the cost-reduction goals were met. At UA Senior Design Day 2016, the final prototype was able to operate on battery power to gather orientation, acceleration, and temperature data from its internal sensor, process that data, and communicate it through the satellite's radio to a nearby ground station, which then displayed the data on a computer monitor. This project was sponsored by Raytheon Missile Systems.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.E.en
thesis.degree.levelBachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineMechanical Engineeringen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorPine, Geralden
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