Biodiesel Crude Glycerin Fraction Separations with an Emphasis on Methanol Recovery

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/613830
Title:
Biodiesel Crude Glycerin Fraction Separations with an Emphasis on Methanol Recovery
Author:
Dougless, Austin William; Kendra; Karla; Kayla
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The University of Arizona Biodiesel Pilot Plant aims to convert waste cooking oil from restaurants located at the university’s student unions into biodiesel to fuel campus vehicles. With the help of the project’s community industrial partner, Grecycle, students from a variety of majors have constructed a 100-gallon single reactor plant and quality-testing laboratory. The waste cooking oil is collected from student unions, filtered, and deposited at the plant. From there, students use chemical processes to convert the waste oil into biodiesel meeting the American Society for Testing and Material’s quality standards. Our project intends to optimize the separations of the liquid byproduct stream by more efficiently recovering methanol for recycling, as well as separating water and glycerin, thus creating higher purity, more valuable products. Both Aspen and ChemCAD will be utilized to simulate a divided wall column separations method for this process at the pilot scale, and a full process design will be provided as a template for future pilot and large scale biodiesel operations.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
Bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Chemical Engineering
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Ogden, Kimberly

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleBiodiesel Crude Glycerin Fraction Separations with an Emphasis on Methanol Recoveryen_US
dc.creatorDougless, Austin Williamen
dc.creatorKendraen
dc.creatorKarlaen
dc.creatorKaylaen
dc.contributor.authorDougless, Austin Williamen
dc.contributor.authorKendraen
dc.contributor.authorKarlaen
dc.contributor.authorKaylaen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractThe University of Arizona Biodiesel Pilot Plant aims to convert waste cooking oil from restaurants located at the university’s student unions into biodiesel to fuel campus vehicles. With the help of the project’s community industrial partner, Grecycle, students from a variety of majors have constructed a 100-gallon single reactor plant and quality-testing laboratory. The waste cooking oil is collected from student unions, filtered, and deposited at the plant. From there, students use chemical processes to convert the waste oil into biodiesel meeting the American Society for Testing and Material’s quality standards. Our project intends to optimize the separations of the liquid byproduct stream by more efficiently recovering methanol for recycling, as well as separating water and glycerin, thus creating higher purity, more valuable products. Both Aspen and ChemCAD will be utilized to simulate a divided wall column separations method for this process at the pilot scale, and a full process design will be provided as a template for future pilot and large scale biodiesel operations.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
thesis.degree.levelBachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineChemical Engineeringen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorOgden, Kimberlyen
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