NSA DATA COLLECTION PROGRAM: THE CHALLENGE OF ASSESING EFFECTIVENESS

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/613829
Title:
NSA DATA COLLECTION PROGRAM: THE CHALLENGE OF ASSESING EFFECTIVENESS
Author:
DEIBEL, CHARLES LOUIS, II
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The National Security Agency (NSA) has played a key role in the United States Government’s counterterror program since September 11. Over the last 15 years, the NSA has faced considerable controversy regarding its counterterrorism data collection program and the legal authority behind it. This paper, however, is concerned with whether or not that program has been effective in preventing Islamist related or inspired terror attacks inside the United States. As NSA capabilities and authorities have expanded since 9/11, has it been effective in helping to prevent attacks in the U.S.? Definitively answering this question is extremely difficult, given significant challenges regarding the amount and quality of public information concerning NSA’s involvement in prevented terror attacks. Yet, this does not mean that some preliminary conclusions cannot be made regarding NSA’s involvement in counterterror cases. A review of two separate data-sets that catalog Islamist inspired or related terror plots, has permitted certain inferences regarding NSA’s involvement in particular cases. This effort has nonetheless highlighted the difficulties faced by public researchers in studying a clandestine agency’s implementation of policy.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
Bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Political Science
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Tidd, John

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleNSA DATA COLLECTION PROGRAM: THE CHALLENGE OF ASSESING EFFECTIVENESSen_US
dc.creatorDEIBEL, CHARLES LOUIS, IIen
dc.contributor.authorDEIBEL, CHARLES LOUIS, IIen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractThe National Security Agency (NSA) has played a key role in the United States Government’s counterterror program since September 11. Over the last 15 years, the NSA has faced considerable controversy regarding its counterterrorism data collection program and the legal authority behind it. This paper, however, is concerned with whether or not that program has been effective in preventing Islamist related or inspired terror attacks inside the United States. As NSA capabilities and authorities have expanded since 9/11, has it been effective in helping to prevent attacks in the U.S.? Definitively answering this question is extremely difficult, given significant challenges regarding the amount and quality of public information concerning NSA’s involvement in prevented terror attacks. Yet, this does not mean that some preliminary conclusions cannot be made regarding NSA’s involvement in counterterror cases. A review of two separate data-sets that catalog Islamist inspired or related terror plots, has permitted certain inferences regarding NSA’s involvement in particular cases. This effort has nonetheless highlighted the difficulties faced by public researchers in studying a clandestine agency’s implementation of policy.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en
thesis.degree.levelBachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplinePolitical Scienceen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorTidd, Johnen
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