‘THOSE WHO WERE FOUND HERE’: AN ANALYSIS OF THE ESTABLISHMENT OF SENSE OF PLACE AMONG THE COEUR D’ALÉNE PEOPLE THROUGH THE LENS OF THE COYOTE CYCLE OF ORAL HISTORIES, WITH DISCOURSE ON THEMATIC ROLES IN THE HISTORIES, AND A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE LANGUAGE ITSELF

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/613827
Title:
‘THOSE WHO WERE FOUND HERE’: AN ANALYSIS OF THE ESTABLISHMENT OF SENSE OF PLACE AMONG THE COEUR D’ALÉNE PEOPLE THROUGH THE LENS OF THE COYOTE CYCLE OF ORAL HISTORIES, WITH DISCOURSE ON THEMATIC ROLES IN THE HISTORIES, AND A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE LANGUAGE ITSELF
Author:
BIEDNY, JEROME VINCENT, III
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The Coyote Cycle of oral history of the Coeur D’Alene people is rich in etiological content. These narratives seek to anchor the ethnic Snchitsu’umsh group geographically as well as provide context to the origin of much of the Coeur D’Alene world, such as the origin of the native tribes, the release of salmon to feed the people, and much more. The texts will be used to provide evidence of this etiological intention and show that in many cases the oral histories tie the ethnic community with specific geographical locations on their traditional lands. A specific case study of an auxiliary character with emphasis on thematic role in the narratives explains some of the intent in these oral histories. Lastly, by tracing some historical changes in the language and assessing ways in which the community has responded to language attrition, specifically, that issues of language purity have arisen as a consequence of this attrition. Evidence will show that the language borrowed some words from English and French as well as created its own words for many of the new concepts upon contact.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
Bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Linguistics
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Fountain, Amy

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.title‘THOSE WHO WERE FOUND HERE’: AN ANALYSIS OF THE ESTABLISHMENT OF SENSE OF PLACE AMONG THE COEUR D’ALÉNE PEOPLE THROUGH THE LENS OF THE COYOTE CYCLE OF ORAL HISTORIES, WITH DISCOURSE ON THEMATIC ROLES IN THE HISTORIES, AND A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE LANGUAGE ITSELFen_US
dc.creatorBIEDNY, JEROME VINCENT, IIIen
dc.contributor.authorBIEDNY, JEROME VINCENT, IIIen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractThe Coyote Cycle of oral history of the Coeur D’Alene people is rich in etiological content. These narratives seek to anchor the ethnic Snchitsu’umsh group geographically as well as provide context to the origin of much of the Coeur D’Alene world, such as the origin of the native tribes, the release of salmon to feed the people, and much more. The texts will be used to provide evidence of this etiological intention and show that in many cases the oral histories tie the ethnic community with specific geographical locations on their traditional lands. A specific case study of an auxiliary character with emphasis on thematic role in the narratives explains some of the intent in these oral histories. Lastly, by tracing some historical changes in the language and assessing ways in which the community has responded to language attrition, specifically, that issues of language purity have arisen as a consequence of this attrition. Evidence will show that the language borrowed some words from English and French as well as created its own words for many of the new concepts upon contact.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en
thesis.degree.levelBachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineLinguisticsen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorFountain, Amyen
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