Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/613805
Title:
HOW SMALL CAN AN ELECTRO-OPTICAL TRANSOCEANIC CABLE BE?
Author:
Wilkins, George A.
Affiliation:
Naval Ocean Systems Center Hawaii Laboratory
Issue Date:
1981-10
Rights:
Copyright © International Foundation for Telemetering
Collection Information:
Proceedings from the International Telemetering Conference are made available by the International Foundation for Telemetering and the University of Arizona Libraries. Visit http://www.telemetry.org/index.php/contact-us if you have questions about items in this collection.
Publisher:
International Foundation for Telemetering
Journal:
International Telemetering Conference Proceedings
Abstract:
Design theory and analyses are presented for a transoceanic, electro-optical ( E-O), telemetry cable which---because its data, power and tensile functions can be separately optimized---has a very small diameter and transport volume. These reductions are achieved with no compromises of operational or material constraints on the telemetry system. For example, an ocean E-O cable which can directly support repeatered, multi-fiber telemetry between Japan and the United States will have a diameter less than 0.75 cm. Its transport volume will be barely 5% of that required for the smallest coaxial cable (SD List 1 with a 3.18-cm diameter) now being used in transoceanic communications. A cable design is demonstrated for a set of system parameters which define a 5550-kmlong “baseline” communications system. The study evaluates that system’s sensitivity to changes in such system parameters as length, repeater power and separation, water depth and safety factor, cable specific gravity, dielectric voltage stress, conductor conductivity, and the failure- or yield strains of loadbearing components. It is concluded that the cable should be relatively inexpensive. Its design can be tailored for specific applications with little change in manufacturing complexity or cost. The cost and risk of ocean deployment should be considerably reduced, since small ships can be loaded with ocean-crossing lengths of this miniature E-O cable.
Sponsors:
International Foundation for Telemetering
ISSN:
0884-5123; 0074-9079
Additional Links:
http://www.telemetry.org/

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleHOW SMALL CAN AN ELECTRO-OPTICAL TRANSOCEANIC CABLE BE?en_US
dc.contributor.authorWilkins, George A.en
dc.contributor.departmentNaval Ocean Systems Center Hawaii Laboratoryen
dc.date.issued1981-10-
dc.rightsCopyright © International Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.description.collectioninformationProceedings from the International Telemetering Conference are made available by the International Foundation for Telemetering and the University of Arizona Libraries. Visit http://www.telemetry.org/index.php/contact-us if you have questions about items in this collection.en
dc.publisherInternational Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.description.abstractDesign theory and analyses are presented for a transoceanic, electro-optical ( E-O), telemetry cable which---because its data, power and tensile functions can be separately optimized---has a very small diameter and transport volume. These reductions are achieved with no compromises of operational or material constraints on the telemetry system. For example, an ocean E-O cable which can directly support repeatered, multi-fiber telemetry between Japan and the United States will have a diameter less than 0.75 cm. Its transport volume will be barely 5% of that required for the smallest coaxial cable (SD List 1 with a 3.18-cm diameter) now being used in transoceanic communications. A cable design is demonstrated for a set of system parameters which define a 5550-kmlong “baseline” communications system. The study evaluates that system’s sensitivity to changes in such system parameters as length, repeater power and separation, water depth and safety factor, cable specific gravity, dielectric voltage stress, conductor conductivity, and the failure- or yield strains of loadbearing components. It is concluded that the cable should be relatively inexpensive. Its design can be tailored for specific applications with little change in manufacturing complexity or cost. The cost and risk of ocean deployment should be considerably reduced, since small ships can be loaded with ocean-crossing lengths of this miniature E-O cable.en
dc.description.sponsorshipInternational Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.identifier.issn0884-5123-
dc.identifier.issn0074-9079-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/613805-
dc.identifier.journalInternational Telemetering Conference Proceedingsen
dc.typetexten
dc.typeProceedingsen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.telemetry.org/en
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