Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/613784
Title:
COMMERCIAL-OFF-THE-SHELF INFRASTRUCTURE FOR A 1U CUBESAT
Author:
Williams, Kaitlyn Elizabeth; Bossler, Benjamin; Hubbell, Reed; Tsang, Alfie; Whitman, Dean; Wirth, Steven
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
CubeSat nanosatellites use a standardized chassis format to permit low-cost space missions through the use of standardized components and launch systems. However, many CubeSat missions still cost far too much due to the use of costly “space-rated” components. This project focused on the development of a sub-$5,000 CubeSat through the following techniques: 1. Use of consumer-off-the-shelf (COTS) components. Space-rated and custom microcontrollers, radios, and other components carry a very hefty price tag. COTS components are commercially available and therefore much less expensive. 2. Use and validation of a miniature HAM radio for communications. HAM radios are regularly used for the communications systems in CubeSats, but they are usually custom-made. 3. Use of 3-D printing for the internal structure, which has great potential for cost and mass savings. 3-D printing permits greater creativity in design than the standard stack format. The satellite will gather data, record temperature and orientation telemetry. It utilizes COTS components including a Yaesu VX-3R amateur HAM radio, a Teensy 3.2 microcontroller, and an Arduino MicroModem, in addition to a 3-D printed internal structure. This project is sponsored by Raytheon Missile Systems.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.E.
Degree Level:
Bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Optical Sciences & Engineering
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Pine, Gerald

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleCOMMERCIAL-OFF-THE-SHELF INFRASTRUCTURE FOR A 1U CUBESATen_US
dc.creatorWilliams, Kaitlyn Elizabethen
dc.creatorBossler, Benjaminen
dc.creatorHubbell, Reeden
dc.creatorTsang, Alfieen
dc.creatorWhitman, Deanen
dc.creatorWirth, Stevenen
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Kaitlyn Elizabethen
dc.contributor.authorBossler, Benjaminen
dc.contributor.authorHubbell, Reeden
dc.contributor.authorTsang, Alfieen
dc.contributor.authorWhitman, Deanen
dc.contributor.authorWirth, Stevenen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractCubeSat nanosatellites use a standardized chassis format to permit low-cost space missions through the use of standardized components and launch systems. However, many CubeSat missions still cost far too much due to the use of costly “space-rated” components. This project focused on the development of a sub-$5,000 CubeSat through the following techniques: 1. Use of consumer-off-the-shelf (COTS) components. Space-rated and custom microcontrollers, radios, and other components carry a very hefty price tag. COTS components are commercially available and therefore much less expensive. 2. Use and validation of a miniature HAM radio for communications. HAM radios are regularly used for the communications systems in CubeSats, but they are usually custom-made. 3. Use of 3-D printing for the internal structure, which has great potential for cost and mass savings. 3-D printing permits greater creativity in design than the standard stack format. The satellite will gather data, record temperature and orientation telemetry. It utilizes COTS components including a Yaesu VX-3R amateur HAM radio, a Teensy 3.2 microcontroller, and an Arduino MicroModem, in addition to a 3-D printed internal structure. This project is sponsored by Raytheon Missile Systems.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.E.en
thesis.degree.levelBachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineOptical Sciences & Engineeringen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorPine, Geralden
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