Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/613750
Title:
SELF-EFFICACY OF PHYSICALLY FIT SENIORS: A QUALITATIVE STUDY
Author:
WAMBOLD, NYLA
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
On average, a person’s physical fitness and health will begin to decline in his/her late twenties to early thirties (Kail, 2010). While the numerous benefits of physical activity is well-known, only 40.7% of 60-69 year olds and 23.4% of adults over 80 continue to be active (Carlson, et al., 2015). Through the use of qualitative research, this study aimed to identify the motivations, facilitators/barriers, and strategies of seniors (ages 60+) who maintain a physically fit lifestyle. Eight participants (4 male, 4 female) were recruited using flyers and snowball sampling. Activities included swimming, CrossFit training, running, hiking, cycling, and equestrian riding. The participants were each interviewed and asked questions regarding their training procedures, typical daily activities, age-related limitations, motivations, and perceived benefits. Each interview recording was transcribed and coded for themes. The primary themes that emerged described the motivations for being fit, the initiative of taking charge of one’s own health, and the recommendations of maintaining s physically fit lifestyle. The challenges that seniors face include: pain, physical barriers, health care providers who fail to recommend exercise and lack of knowledge (Schutzer & Graves, 2004). The long term goals of our research include identifying ways to help active seniors continue to exercise, helping inactive seniors increase their exercise, and identifying useful training strategies for athletic trainers.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
Bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Bowen, Anne

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleSELF-EFFICACY OF PHYSICALLY FIT SENIORS: A QUALITATIVE STUDYen_US
dc.creatorWAMBOLD, NYLAen
dc.contributor.authorWAMBOLD, NYLAen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractOn average, a person’s physical fitness and health will begin to decline in his/her late twenties to early thirties (Kail, 2010). While the numerous benefits of physical activity is well-known, only 40.7% of 60-69 year olds and 23.4% of adults over 80 continue to be active (Carlson, et al., 2015). Through the use of qualitative research, this study aimed to identify the motivations, facilitators/barriers, and strategies of seniors (ages 60+) who maintain a physically fit lifestyle. Eight participants (4 male, 4 female) were recruited using flyers and snowball sampling. Activities included swimming, CrossFit training, running, hiking, cycling, and equestrian riding. The participants were each interviewed and asked questions regarding their training procedures, typical daily activities, age-related limitations, motivations, and perceived benefits. Each interview recording was transcribed and coded for themes. The primary themes that emerged described the motivations for being fit, the initiative of taking charge of one’s own health, and the recommendations of maintaining s physically fit lifestyle. The challenges that seniors face include: pain, physical barriers, health care providers who fail to recommend exercise and lack of knowledge (Schutzer & Graves, 2004). The long term goals of our research include identifying ways to help active seniors continue to exercise, helping inactive seniors increase their exercise, and identifying useful training strategies for athletic trainers.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
thesis.degree.levelBachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorBowen, Anneen
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