THE EFFECT OF EXECUTIVE FUNCTION ON EMERGENT LITERACY SKILLS A META-ANALYSIS

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/613741
Title:
THE EFFECT OF EXECUTIVE FUNCTION ON EMERGENT LITERACY SKILLS A META-ANALYSIS
Author:
THOMAS, SHELBY ALAYNE
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of the present study was to organize a meta-analysis that synthesizes research on the relationship between executive functioning and literacy skills of children. Google Scholar and the University of Arizona Library database were searched for studies, ultimately resulting in a total of seven reviewed research articles. For each study, the effect size r was extracted or calculated. Multiple effect sizes from within studies (i.e., multiple indicators of executive function) were averaged. Effect sizes were then standardized, weighted, and meta-analyzed in Excel. The standardized effect size of executive function on literacy skills was Zr = 0.37 (SE = .03). The correlation is strong enough that researchers and caretakers can use this information to understand more about the indicators of strong literacy skills, namely the development of working memory, inhibitory control, attention-shifting, and delay of gratification. Not only does knowledge of this effect size allow researchers to be more informed about the connection when conducting future studies, but it allows child care professionals, parents, and caretakers to recognize their child's environmental needs to enhance cognitive development.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
Bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Family Studies and Human Development
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Mastergeorge, Ann

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleTHE EFFECT OF EXECUTIVE FUNCTION ON EMERGENT LITERACY SKILLS A META-ANALYSISen_US
dc.creatorTHOMAS, SHELBY ALAYNEen
dc.contributor.authorTHOMAS, SHELBY ALAYNEen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of the present study was to organize a meta-analysis that synthesizes research on the relationship between executive functioning and literacy skills of children. Google Scholar and the University of Arizona Library database were searched for studies, ultimately resulting in a total of seven reviewed research articles. For each study, the effect size r was extracted or calculated. Multiple effect sizes from within studies (i.e., multiple indicators of executive function) were averaged. Effect sizes were then standardized, weighted, and meta-analyzed in Excel. The standardized effect size of executive function on literacy skills was Zr = 0.37 (SE = .03). The correlation is strong enough that researchers and caretakers can use this information to understand more about the indicators of strong literacy skills, namely the development of working memory, inhibitory control, attention-shifting, and delay of gratification. Not only does knowledge of this effect size allow researchers to be more informed about the connection when conducting future studies, but it allows child care professionals, parents, and caretakers to recognize their child's environmental needs to enhance cognitive development.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
thesis.degree.levelBachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineFamily Studies and Human Developmenten
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorMastergeorge, Annen
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