THE GLOBAL DISTRIBUTION OF IODINE-129 AND ITS POTENTIAL APPLICATION AS AN AGE TRACER IN THE TUCSON BASIN

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/613732
Title:
THE GLOBAL DISTRIBUTION OF IODINE-129 AND ITS POTENTIAL APPLICATION AS AN AGE TRACER IN THE TUCSON BASIN
Author:
Tritz, Claire
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Radiogenic tracers help determine groundwater recharge rates and flow paths. Decreasing environmental tritium concentrations necessitate the use of a new radiogenic tracer. Iodine-129 (129I), a long-lived radioisotope generated by nuclear weapons and fuel reprocessing, offers a potential alternative. This study compared the isotopic ratio of 129I to stable 127I with ages previously calculated with tritium. A strong logarithmic correlation was found between the tritium ages and the isotopic ratio. Values from Sabino Canyon and Marshall Gulch precipitation and surface water were compared to global values from published research and in both cases isotopic ratios in precipitation were higher than for surface water, which were higher than ocean or groundwater. The Arizona samples show a seasonal variation in isotopic ratio between summer monsoon and winter frontal precipitation, with values significantly higher in the summer. Mixing model analysis performed on Marshall Gulch surface water and using deep groundwater, precipitation, and soil water as end members, showed a shift in sulfate concentration between these seasons that mimics the variation in isotopic ratio. However, the difference in precipitation source between the summer monsoon and winter frontal precipitation may be a factor in the variations.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
Bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Environmental Hydrology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
McIntosh, Jennifer

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleTHE GLOBAL DISTRIBUTION OF IODINE-129 AND ITS POTENTIAL APPLICATION AS AN AGE TRACER IN THE TUCSON BASINen_US
dc.creatorTritz, Claireen
dc.contributor.authorTritz, Claireen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractRadiogenic tracers help determine groundwater recharge rates and flow paths. Decreasing environmental tritium concentrations necessitate the use of a new radiogenic tracer. Iodine-129 (129I), a long-lived radioisotope generated by nuclear weapons and fuel reprocessing, offers a potential alternative. This study compared the isotopic ratio of 129I to stable 127I with ages previously calculated with tritium. A strong logarithmic correlation was found between the tritium ages and the isotopic ratio. Values from Sabino Canyon and Marshall Gulch precipitation and surface water were compared to global values from published research and in both cases isotopic ratios in precipitation were higher than for surface water, which were higher than ocean or groundwater. The Arizona samples show a seasonal variation in isotopic ratio between summer monsoon and winter frontal precipitation, with values significantly higher in the summer. Mixing model analysis performed on Marshall Gulch surface water and using deep groundwater, precipitation, and soil water as end members, showed a shift in sulfate concentration between these seasons that mimics the variation in isotopic ratio. However, the difference in precipitation source between the summer monsoon and winter frontal precipitation may be a factor in the variations.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
thesis.degree.levelBachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineEnvironmental Hydrologyen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorMcIntosh, Jenniferen
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