IDENTIFYING LOWLAND LEOPARD FROGS (LITHOBATES YAVAPAIENSIS) USING IN SITU PHOTOGRAPHY

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/613634
Title:
IDENTIFYING LOWLAND LEOPARD FROGS (LITHOBATES YAVAPAIENSIS) USING IN SITU PHOTOGRAPHY
Author:
THOMAS, ALYSSA SHEA
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Lowland leopard frogs (Lithobates yavapaiensis) are endemic to Arizona, New Mexico, Sonora, and Chihuahua. Due to conservation concerns about this species and potential risk of injury, stress, and spread of disease during research efforts, in situ photography could provide an alternative for identifying individuals without capturing and handling frogs. I administered 25 pairs of photographs to 35 participants and asked them to determine if the frogs in the photograph were the same individual. I also asked them to gauge the degree of confidence they had in each response, as well as questions about themselves, including their experience observing wildlife in general and lowland leopard frogs in particular, and whether they enjoyed puzzles. Participants identified matches (86.9% correct) and mismatches (87.4% correct) with similar accuracy, and both reflected their estimated degree of confidence. Only participants with experience observing wildlife had higher scores. Overall, in situ photography offers promise as a method to identify individual leopard frogs and perhaps other species with distinctive individual patterns.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
Bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Veterinary Science
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Steidl, Robert

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleIDENTIFYING LOWLAND LEOPARD FROGS (LITHOBATES YAVAPAIENSIS) USING IN SITU PHOTOGRAPHYen_US
dc.creatorTHOMAS, ALYSSA SHEAen
dc.contributor.authorTHOMAS, ALYSSA SHEAen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractLowland leopard frogs (Lithobates yavapaiensis) are endemic to Arizona, New Mexico, Sonora, and Chihuahua. Due to conservation concerns about this species and potential risk of injury, stress, and spread of disease during research efforts, in situ photography could provide an alternative for identifying individuals without capturing and handling frogs. I administered 25 pairs of photographs to 35 participants and asked them to determine if the frogs in the photograph were the same individual. I also asked them to gauge the degree of confidence they had in each response, as well as questions about themselves, including their experience observing wildlife in general and lowland leopard frogs in particular, and whether they enjoyed puzzles. Participants identified matches (86.9% correct) and mismatches (87.4% correct) with similar accuracy, and both reflected their estimated degree of confidence. Only participants with experience observing wildlife had higher scores. Overall, in situ photography offers promise as a method to identify individual leopard frogs and perhaps other species with distinctive individual patterns.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
thesis.degree.levelBachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineVeterinary Scienceen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorSteidl, Roberten
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