THE INTERNATIONAL CRIMINAL COURT AND THE UNITED STATES: DISPELLING THE FEAR SURROUNDING U.S. RATIFICATION

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/613630
Title:
THE INTERNATIONAL CRIMINAL COURT AND THE UNITED STATES: DISPELLING THE FEAR SURROUNDING U.S. RATIFICATION
Author:
STAFFORD, JOSHUA TAKA
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In this day of rapid technological development and the resulting increase in globalization, there has been a call to reassess the judicial mechanisms we have in place. A sense of universal responsibility prompted the international community to establish the International Criminal Court (ICC) in order to promote global peace and security. The ICC is a judicial institution that seeks to prosecute individuals responsible for war crimes, genocide, and crimes against humanity. However, the United States has yet to become a member; a controversial decision that has polarized political and legal scholars. Issues of state sovereignty, possible prosecution of U.S. military personnel, constitutional incompatibility, and others have been raised to argue against U.S. ratification. Upon extensive research concerning the ICC in its relationship with the US, the author of this paper has concluded that the U.S. would benefit from joining the ICC. Starting from the basic history and structure concerning the ICC, this paper will then delve into the various arguments offered by the opponents of U.S. involvement as well as the counter-arguments of its advocates.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
Bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Law
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Nabti, Najwa

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleTHE INTERNATIONAL CRIMINAL COURT AND THE UNITED STATES: DISPELLING THE FEAR SURROUNDING U.S. RATIFICATIONen_US
dc.creatorSTAFFORD, JOSHUA TAKAen
dc.contributor.authorSTAFFORD, JOSHUA TAKAen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractIn this day of rapid technological development and the resulting increase in globalization, there has been a call to reassess the judicial mechanisms we have in place. A sense of universal responsibility prompted the international community to establish the International Criminal Court (ICC) in order to promote global peace and security. The ICC is a judicial institution that seeks to prosecute individuals responsible for war crimes, genocide, and crimes against humanity. However, the United States has yet to become a member; a controversial decision that has polarized political and legal scholars. Issues of state sovereignty, possible prosecution of U.S. military personnel, constitutional incompatibility, and others have been raised to argue against U.S. ratification. Upon extensive research concerning the ICC in its relationship with the US, the author of this paper has concluded that the U.S. would benefit from joining the ICC. Starting from the basic history and structure concerning the ICC, this paper will then delve into the various arguments offered by the opponents of U.S. involvement as well as the counter-arguments of its advocates.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en
thesis.degree.levelBachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineLawen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorNabti, Najwaen
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