ASSOCIATIVE LEARNING IN ANTS: ODOR LEARNING VS. COLOR LEARNING IN NOVOMESSOR COCKERELLI

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/613629
Title:
ASSOCIATIVE LEARNING IN ANTS: ODOR LEARNING VS. COLOR LEARNING IN NOVOMESSOR COCKERELLI
Author:
Sobol, Sky Harris
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Associative learning is a form of learning where an animal learns to associate a stimulus with a behavioral response. Associative learning has been generated in the laboratory for many species, including insects, by using classical conditioning. Previous experiments show that ants can learn to associate odors and colors with a sugar reward. When ants are trained to associate a stimulus with a sugar reward, they exhibit the proboscis extension response (PER) to the stimulus alone, but it was unknown whether ants are better at color association or odor association. In order to test this, two separate experiments were undertaken. The first used classical conditioning to train ants to associate a sucrose solution with an odor. The second used classical conditioning to train two groups of ants. The first group was trained to associate a sucrose solution with a blue light. The second group was trained to associate a sucrose solution with a green light. For both experiments a significant percentage of ants demonstrated learning by exhibiting PER when presented solely with the odor or light. There was, however, no significant difference between the percentages of ants that demonstrated learning from the blue light, the green light, or the odor.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
Bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Neuroscience and Cognitive Science
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Gronenberg, Wulfila

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleASSOCIATIVE LEARNING IN ANTS: ODOR LEARNING VS. COLOR LEARNING IN NOVOMESSOR COCKERELLIen_US
dc.creatorSobol, Sky Harrisen
dc.contributor.authorSobol, Sky Harrisen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractAssociative learning is a form of learning where an animal learns to associate a stimulus with a behavioral response. Associative learning has been generated in the laboratory for many species, including insects, by using classical conditioning. Previous experiments show that ants can learn to associate odors and colors with a sugar reward. When ants are trained to associate a stimulus with a sugar reward, they exhibit the proboscis extension response (PER) to the stimulus alone, but it was unknown whether ants are better at color association or odor association. In order to test this, two separate experiments were undertaken. The first used classical conditioning to train ants to associate a sucrose solution with an odor. The second used classical conditioning to train two groups of ants. The first group was trained to associate a sucrose solution with a blue light. The second group was trained to associate a sucrose solution with a green light. For both experiments a significant percentage of ants demonstrated learning by exhibiting PER when presented solely with the odor or light. There was, however, no significant difference between the percentages of ants that demonstrated learning from the blue light, the green light, or the odor.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
thesis.degree.levelBachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineNeuroscience and Cognitive Scienceen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorGronenberg, Wulfilaen
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