CALCULUS ENROLLMENT IN HIGH SCHOOL: HOW SCHOOLS PROVIDE OPPORTUNITIES FOR MATHEMATICAL ACHIEVEMENT

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/613624
Title:
CALCULUS ENROLLMENT IN HIGH SCHOOL: HOW SCHOOLS PROVIDE OPPORTUNITIES FOR MATHEMATICAL ACHIEVEMENT
Author:
SHEEN, EMILY
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Mathematics education in the United States ranks poorly compared to other developed nations. This research paper examines calculus enrollment in over 18,000 high schools across the United States to determine how school characteristics like race/ethnicity, school size, low income, urban/rural locale, state, and other variables associate with calculus offering and enrollment rates. Using descriptive statistics and multiple linear regression, this study finds that race and ethnicity variables have the strongest correlation with calculus enrollment rates compared to other school characteristics. In particular, the percentage of Asian students at a school has the most statistically significant and meaningful positive correlation with calculus enrollment, while the percentages of black, Hispanic, and Native American students have negative correlations with calculus enrollment.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
Bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Business Economics
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Sugiyama, Alexandre Borges

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleCALCULUS ENROLLMENT IN HIGH SCHOOL: HOW SCHOOLS PROVIDE OPPORTUNITIES FOR MATHEMATICAL ACHIEVEMENTen_US
dc.creatorSHEEN, EMILYen
dc.contributor.authorSHEEN, EMILYen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractMathematics education in the United States ranks poorly compared to other developed nations. This research paper examines calculus enrollment in over 18,000 high schools across the United States to determine how school characteristics like race/ethnicity, school size, low income, urban/rural locale, state, and other variables associate with calculus offering and enrollment rates. Using descriptive statistics and multiple linear regression, this study finds that race and ethnicity variables have the strongest correlation with calculus enrollment rates compared to other school characteristics. In particular, the percentage of Asian students at a school has the most statistically significant and meaningful positive correlation with calculus enrollment, while the percentages of black, Hispanic, and Native American students have negative correlations with calculus enrollment.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
thesis.degree.levelBachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineBusiness Economicsen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorSugiyama, Alexandre Borgesen
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